Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Structural factors news

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Trump’s bid to wipe out AIDS will take more than a pill

Eradicating the virus will need to look less like a science experiment and more like a broad social welfare program.

Published
11 June 2019
From
Politico
US: Nearly 1 in 5 People Living With HIV Have Suboptimal Geographic Access to HIV Care

Nearly 10% of people living with HIV have to travel more than an hour to access HIV care, and those living in rural counties have drive times more than double that of those in urban counties.

Published
03 June 2019
From
American Journal of Managed Care
Gay men in PROUD trial experienced high rates of intimate partner violence

Screening for intimate partner violence should form part of sexual health services to reach vulnerable gay men.

Published
03 June 2019
From
Avert
What works against self-stigma? First systematic review aims to find out

A systematic review of whether different interventions helped to overcome self-stigma in people in African and Asian countries who are living with or at risk of HIV

Published
24 May 2019
By
Gus Cairns
Cocaine injecting and homelessness 'behind Glasgow HIV rise'

A rise in cocaine injecting and homelessness are behind a 10-fold increase in HIV infection among drug users in Glasgow, research suggests.

Published
10 April 2019
From
BBC News
Education and HIV incidence among girls in Africa – a strong association but still no evidence of causation

Education is a critical component of young women’s health and empowerment programmes – but we need to be careful not to assume an immediate direct effect on HIV incidence.

Published
22 March 2019
From
AVERT
Viral Load Does Not Equal Value

Are We Shaming Those Who Are Detectable? To contend with this issue and fight the epidemic, we must confront structural barriers and address stigma. What’s more, we must imagine new ways to provide community support beyond offering only clinical solutions.

Published
20 February 2019
From
POZ
To end the HIV epidemic, addressing poverty and inequities one of most important treatments

What we need most urgently today is a new generation of rigorously evaluated, cost-effective HIV interventions focused on the fundamental contextual factors for disease. These factors include access to adequate housing , access to quality health care and health insurance , access to child care , education, employment status, gender equality and income.

Published
16 February 2019
From
The Conversation
'Invisible epidemic': progress against HIV leaves young Latino men behind

As new diagnoses decrease in the country as a whole, the story is different for individual communities.

Published
16 February 2019
From
The Guardian
Eradicating HIV in Black Communities Requires Systemic Change

If left unacknowledged, persistent racial and gender disparities in HIV transmission and treatment will continue to thwart any effort to curtail the pandemic.

Published
16 February 2019
From
Rewire.News
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.