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Drinking three or more cups of coffee a day halves the risk of dying for people with HIV/HCV co-infection

Drinking three or more cups of coffee a day halves the risk of death from any cause for people with HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection,

Published
03 October 2017
By
Michael Carter
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease common in people living with HIV – metabolic disorders are key risk factors

Over a third of people with HIV have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the absence of hepatitis B or C, according to the results

Published
12 July 2017
By
Michael Carter
Ramadan, Fasting & HIV

Ramadan is the name of one of the 12 lunar months of the Islamic calendar. For 29 days of Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise until sunset. Many HIV-positive wish to join their community in observing this important month, can they?

Published
26 May 2017
From
LASS
Food is Medicine for HIV-Positive and Type 2 Diabetes Patients

HIV-positive people who received healthy food and snacks for six months were more likely to adhere to their medication regimens, were less depressed and less likely to make trade-offs between food and healthcare, according to a new study.

Published
26 January 2017
From
University of California San Francisco
Vitamin D supplements 'advised for everyone'

Everyone should consider taking vitamin D supplements in autumn and winter, public health advice in England and Wales says.

Published
25 July 2016
From
BBC Health
Not So Fast: Do people with HIV really experience accelerated aging?

Recent talk about HIV and aging has almost always been scary. A number of studies conclude that people living with HIV have so-called “accelerated aging”—meaning they will suffer heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and osteoporosis more often and sooner than those without HIV. Well, this is one article on aging and HIV that will challenge the concept of people living with HIV having an early expiration date. Instead, we can look at what we know and what we don’t, to get a better idea of what the risks are for HIV-positive people growing older—and what they can do about them.

Published
08 July 2016
From
Positively Aware
High rates of modifiable cancer risk factors present in Western HIV-positive patients

The prevalence of potentially modifiable risk factors for some cancers is “extraordinarily high” among people with HIV, according to results of a meta-analysis published in

Published
18 January 2016
By
Michael Carter
Not having enough food linked with lower chances of sustained viral suppression for ART-treated breastfeeding mothers in Uganda

Not having enough food is associated with poorer chances of achieving a sustained viral suppression among antiretroviral-treated breastfeeding women in Uganda, investigators report in the online edition of

Published
12 January 2016
By
Michael Carter
“Can People with HIV Eat Sushi?”: Your HIV & Diet Questions Answered

These days the top health concerns for people with HIV are the same nutrition and diet-associated health problems faced by other Americans, like becoming overweight or obese. I often worry more about the impact of fast food and soda on my patients than I do about them getting sick from something related to HIV.

Published
24 November 2015
From
BETA blog
Risk of heart attack rises with length of HIV infection, regardless of age

Ten years after becoming infected with HIV, a person living with HIV has approximately twice the risk of heart attack compared to someone who has just acquired

Published
27 October 2015
By
Keith Alcorn
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.