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Naltrexone implants provide better HIV treatment outcomes for those with HIV and opioid addiction in Russia

A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised trial conducted in Russia found that slow-release naltrexone implants resulted in better HIV treatment outcomes for people living with HIV and opioid dependence when compared

Published
19 April 2019
By
Krishen Samuel
Gilead's first big TV push for triple combo Biktarvy showcases HIV diversity

Gilead Sciences wanted to represent the wide range of people living with HIV in its first national TV campaign for Biktarvy. So they chose black, Latino, male, female, gay, bisexual and transgender actors for an ad that encourages people with HIV to “keep being you.”

Published
18 April 2019
From
FiercePharma
Novel Antibody May Suppress HIV for Up to Four Months

Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, according to a report published online today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Published
18 April 2019
From
NIAID
Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

Pharmacokinetic data indicate exposure of elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat (Genvoya, Stribild) is lower during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy than postpartum. Low elvitegravir exposure may be associated with an increased risk of treatment failure and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission to the unborn child, and therefore elvitegravir/cobicistat should not be used during pregnancy.

Published
17 April 2019
From
Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency
Long-Acting HIV Treatment Is Coming. Our Health Care System Needs to Prepare

New conversations are starting in HIV care as phase III trials have shown that monthly injections of cabotegravir and rilpivirine (Edurant) are non-inferior to a three-drug pill regimen. In 2018, TheBody asked a range of people living with HIV about their willingness to switch to an injectible, and most had mixed feelings. But even if there's widespread interest in this new way of taking antiretroviral therapy (and most likely also prevention, not too far away), it's important to consider not just the willingness of people to move to this new form of treatment, but whether health care systems and providers in the U.S. are ready to support this innovation.

Published
16 April 2019
From
The Body Pro
Weight gain with new antiretrovirals: It's complicated

South Africa’s next big shift in our antiretroviral programme is to replace efavirenz with a newish drug called dolutegravir. The Department of Health is pleased at the prospect of a safer, more robust and, amazingly, cheaper drug. But last year, the first reports surfaced that people using it were gaining weight.

Published
15 April 2019
From
Spotlight
He Jiankui's gene editing experiment ignored other HIV strains

He Jiankui's claim that he gave two girls lifetime immunity from HIV ignored the existence of HIV strains that circumvent the gene he edited.

Published
15 April 2019
From
STAT
Dovato Is a Newly Approved Two-Drug HIV Regimen. Do Fewer Drugs Mean a Lower-Cost HIV Treatment?

When HIV drugmaker ViiV announced in late 2017 that it had received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for Juluca (dolutegravir/rilpivirine), the first effective two-drug, single-pill HIV regimen in the modern treatment era, community activists hoped that its price would reflect the fact that it contained one drug fewer than three-drug tablets like Complera (rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/FTC), Genvoya (elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide), Stribild (cobicistat/elvitegravir/FTC/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate), and Triumeq (abacavir/dolutegravir/lamivudine), all of which are generally priced between $2,600 and $3,500 a month in the U.S.

Published
15 April 2019
From
The Body
Jose Arribas, MD, on the Challenges That Come With Long-Acting Injectables

The announcement of the results of the FLAIR and ATLAS studies at the Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in March was a major step forward in the field of long-acting injectables for the treatment and management of HIV. But with advances come challenges.

Published
15 April 2019
From
Contagion Live
Gilead Lawsuits: 41 HIV and PrEP Patients File California Personal Injury Case Over Gilead's TDF-Based Drugs

41 patients from 12 states nationwide who are living with HIV or AIDS or were on PrEP filed a personal injury lawsuit against Gilead Sciences Inc. seeking to hold the Bay Area drug maker accountable for actions around its failure to rectify a known defect in the drug formulation of one of its most widely prescribed medications: tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) knowing that a safer alternate, tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) existed in its own laboratory; its failure to warn patients of the damaging side effects of TDF; and the company’s active misrepresentation of TDF’s efficacy and substantial risks.

Published
12 April 2019
From
Associated Press
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.