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Drug interactions and pharmacokinetics news

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Potential drug interactions among people with HIV taking statins

Drug interactions remain a potential problem for HIV-positive people who are treated with statins, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Heart

Published
09 January 2019
By
Michael Carter
Italian study shows growth in heart and kidney problems in people living with HIV

Reduced kidney function, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease have each become more common in a large cohort of Italians living with HIV followed since 2004, with

Published
28 December 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Transgender women taking PrEP have lower levels of PrEP drugs, especially in rectal tissues, than cisgender men

A study presented at last month’s HIV Research for Prevention conference (HIVR4P) in Madrid shows that transgender women who are taking feminising hormones and also taking pre-exposure

Published
09 November 2018
By
Gus Cairns
The long tail of injectable PrEP is especially long for women

Around four in ten women and one in ten men taking injectable cabotegravir as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) still have evidence of the drug in their body around

Published
25 October 2018
By
Roger Pebody
Many people take drugs that interfere with their blood pressure pills

People who take pills to lower their blood pressure often take other drugs that reduce the pills’ effectiveness, a recent study suggests.

Published
22 August 2018
From
Reuters
PrEP does not lower feminising hormone level in transgender women

Using Truvada (tenofovir DF/emtricitabine) for HIV prevention does not lower levels of feminising hormones, offering reassurance for transgender women who are concerned about drug interactions, according to a

Published
25 July 2018
By
Liz Highleyman
Darunavir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

New pharmacokinetic data show mean exposure of darunavir (brand name Prezista) boosted with cobicistat (available in combination in Rezolsta, Symtuza) to be lower during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy than during 6–12 weeks postpartum. Low darunavir exposure may be associated with an increased risk of treatment failure and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission to the unborn child.

Published
18 July 2018
From
MHRA
Closer Monitoring Recommended for Older Patients Treated With Dolutegravir for HIV

The maximum concentration of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) was significantly higher in people living with HIV who are more than 60 years old compared with younger individuals, according to new findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.There have been recent concerns about DTG-related neuropsychiatric toxicity, especially among older patients with HIV.

Published
11 June 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
FDA says Prezcobix should not be given to pregnant women

Darunavir/cobicistat — marketed as Prezcobix (Janssen) in the United States — should not be given to pregnant women with HIV because of substantially lower exposures of the two medications during pregnancy, the FDA said. The agency updated the label for the once-daily, fixed-dose tablet to reflect the change, which it said was based on data from a small clinical trial involving pregnant women.

Published
11 June 2018
From
Healio (requires free registration)
Potential interactions between ART and other medications present in over half of older HIV-positive people

Over half of older HIV-positive people are at risk of experiencing an interaction between their anti-HIV drugs and medications taken for the treatment of non-HIV-related

Published
31 May 2018
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.