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Cumulative Ritonavir-Boosted Darunavir Use May Be Associated With Increased CVD Risk

In patients infected with HIV, the cumulative use for ritonavir-boosted darunavir was associated with a progressively increasing risk for cardiovascular disease, according to research published in The Lancet HIV.

Published
11 June 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
What's the connection between HIV and high blood pressure?

People with HIV are more likely than people without the virus to have high blood pressure, in part because of treatments and repercussions of the condition itself, a new review of research shows.

Published
23 May 2018
From
American Heart Association News
Increased Risk for Abdominal Obesity Found in People Living With HIV

People living with HIV are at increased risk for abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol but not hypertension, according to a recent study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Published
04 April 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
Switching from abacavir to TAF improves platelet function

People who switched from an antiretroviral regimen containing abacavir to one containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) showed less platelet reactivity, which reduces platelet aggregation or blood clotting, according to

Published
22 March 2018
By
Liz Highleyman
Research sheds more light on cardiovascular risk in people with HIV

People with HIV are more likely to develop cardiovascular conditions, including atherosclerosis and peripheral artery disease, than their HIV-negative counterparts, researchers reported at the 25th

Published
21 March 2018
By
Liz Highleyman
Statin users have lower rates of many types of cancer

Both HIV-positive and HIV-negative people who use statins to manage cardiovascular disease risk also have a lower risk of cancer, according to research presented yesterday at the

Published
08 March 2018
By
Liz Highleyman
US studies underline importance of primary care physicians for people with HIV

People with HIV who have other medical conditions such as high blood pressure or high lipids appear to do better if they have a primary

Published
01 March 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Smoking threatens health gains from hepatitis C treatment, US researchers warn

People with hepatitis C in the United States are at least three times more likely to smoke than the general population but little is being

Published
22 February 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
PrEP does not raise lipids or alter body fat, safety study finds

Using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) does not raise lipid levels or have any substantial effect on body fat, investigators from the iPrEX trial report this month

Published
15 February 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
High prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive people in the US with 'missed opportunities' for its diagnosis and control

There is a high prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive people in the United States and many of these individuals are not receiving hypertensive therapy, investigators

Published
12 February 2018
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.