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Living well with a low CD4 count news

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WHO recommends package of tests, treatment and prevention for 'urgent need' people with HIV with low CD4 counts

A new package of measures to ensure rapid initiation of antiretroviral treatment and diagnosis of opportunistic infections has been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) to

Published
23 July 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Screening for cryptococcal meningitis and adherence support reduce mortality among people starting ART in Africa

Screening and treatment for cryptococcal meningitis combined with a short period of adherence support has the potential to significantly reduce mortality rates among people with very low

Published
24 March 2015
By
Michael Carter
Low CD4 count important risk factor for oral HPV infection in patients with HIV

A low CD4 count is the single most important risk factor for oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in HIV-positive patients, investigators from the United States report in the

Published
23 February 2015
By
Michael Carter
Restoring and maintaining a high CD4 count possible for vast majority of people living with HIV in France

A large French study has shown that the vast majority of people living with HIV who started treatment since 2000 in a national cohort achieved a CD4

Published
12 November 2014
By
Alain Volny-Anne
Regular clinic attendance especially beneficial for people with HIV who have low CD4 counts

People taking HIV treatment who have a low CD4 cell count are especially likely to achieve an undetectable viral if they attend their routine clinic appointments, research published

Published
09 January 2014
By
Michael Carter
Low CD4 cell count increases heart attack risk for people with HIV

Immunodeficiency is an important risk factor for heart attack in people living with HIV, results of a large US study published in the online edition of the

Published
28 October 2013
By
Michael Carter
HIV and TB in Practice for nurses: cotrimoxazole prophylaxis

Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is the use of a common antiobiotic to prevent a range of infections that commonly affect people living with HIV.

Published
23 June 2012
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HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Fluctuating symptoms have major impact on quality of life and fitness to work, survey finds

Common but non-specific symptoms of uncertain cause can dominate the day-to-day life of some people with HIV, a survey by the National AIDS Trust has found. In many

Published
07 September 2011
By
Gus Cairns
Low CD4 cell count associated with poor response to swine flu vaccine for those with HIV

Many HIV-positive patients do not develop protective antibody levels after receiving the standard dose of the swine flu vaccine, a study published in the September 10th edition

Published
31 August 2010
By
Michael Carter
Starting HIV treatment improves immune response to Kaposi's sarcoma

Treatment with antiretroviral drugs dramatically enhances the response of the immune system to Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), often clearing the virus from HIV-positive gay

Published
21 June 2010
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.