HIV treatment and health care for refugees from Ukraine

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Key points

  • People fleeing the war in Ukraine who have ‘temporary protection’ status have the right to use health services, including HIV treatment, in European Union countries.
  • Many non-governmental organisations can help Ukrainian refugees to access antiretroviral therapy, harm reduction supplies, drug dependency treatment, and support for LGBT+ people.
  • Information on this page is presented country by country.

Ця сторінка також доступна українською мовою.

Эта страница также доступна на русском языке. 

This page is also available in Ukrainian and Russian.

This page has information for refugees who are in Ukraine, Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, the Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and the United Kingdom. If you have information to share on services in your country, please contact info@nam.org.uk.

Some aidsmap information resources about living with HIV and HIV treatment are also available in Ukrainian and in Russian.

Online services for refugees in all countries

Non-governmental Ukrainian, regional and international organizations in cooperation with government agencies in Ukraine have organised an external service to help Ukrainians with access to treatment for HIV, TB and hepatitis around the world, as well as online advice and counselling from Ukrainian HIV clinicians. Information on HELPnow is available here (in Ukrainian). Requests can be made via Telegram, email, Instagram or Facebook.

Infectious disease physician Dr Tetiana Kyrychenko can provide free online consultations for people living with HIV in Ukrainian and Russian on the Help24 website set up by Alliance for Public Health to answer clinical questions. Free online consultations with other doctors (including narcologists, psychologists and general practitioners) are available.

Ukrainian-speaking HIV medical specialists can be contacted through the aware.hiv Ukraine website to contact Ukrainian speaking HIV medical specialists for advice and help with HIV treatment.

In response to the crisis, the European Test Finder - a website listing testing services for HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections throughout Europe - is expanding to provide details of facilities offering HIV treatment, opioid substitution therapy, tuberculosis testing and tuberculosis treatment. For the moment, coverage varies from country to country. The Test Finder is available in most European languages including Ukrainian and Russian.

The Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPCru) can provide support with accessing HIV treatment and testing services across Eastern Europe and Central Asia. They can be contacted via email.

The European Union has supported the development of the Treatment4Ukraine website, which provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services in 45 countries.

HIV health care inside Ukraine

Shipments of antiretroviral therapy are continuing to reach Ukraine via Poland and most treatment sites are still working. For those displaced within Ukraine who need ART or opioid substitution therapy, the Ukrainian Ministry of Health is working with local clinics and NGOs such as the Alliance for Public Health and 100% Life to support access to treatment. This includes those who have lost their documents and/or who previously accessed treatment via private healthcare. Hotlines have been established to provide advice to people with HIV and TB, drug dependency and opioid substitution therapy, and viral hepatitis, in Ukrainian. There is also a lot more information on the 100% Life facebook page, in Ukrainian.

The Astar Medical Center in Lviv provides HIV testing, PrEP and antiretroviral medicines for refugees.

HIV health care in Albania

HIV treatment and other health services are available free-of-charge to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. People arriving in Albania from Ukraine should register for temporary protection, which grants the same rights and entitlements as asylum for one year.

There is one HIV clinic in Albania which serves the entire country, based at the University Hospital Center of Tirana "Mother Theresa". Contact details are available from the ECEE network, in Ukrainian and English. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Albanian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Albanian Association of People Living with HIV and AIDS is a non-governmental organisation based in Tirana. They can provide support in accessing treatment and other services. They can be contacted by phone on +355 692481657 or by email at hoxhajolimbi@gmail.com or alb_org_plwha@yahoo.com.

Aksion Plus is a non-governmental organisation with six centres across the country where methadone is dispensed free-of charge. They can also provide advice and support to people who use drugs. They can be contacted by phone on +355696178959 or by email at gencaxionp@gmail.com.

There is general information available for refugees on the UNHCR Albania website, including contacts for helpful services, in English and Ukrainian.  

HIV health care in Andorra

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Armenia

People fleeing the war in Ukraine can apply for asylum in Armenia. Asylum seekers and refugees are entitled to access emergency care, including HIV treatment, free-of-charge. There is more information on the UNHCR Armenia website, in English, Armenian, Arabic, and Persian.

Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. People living with HIV and LGBT+ people should contact New Generation NGO for assistance – they can support you through the asylum process as well as linking you to HIV and psychosocial care. You can contact them by telephone on +374 60 378989 or +374 60 408989 between 10.00-21.00 or by emailing sergeigabrielian@gmail.com or asahakyan.ngngo@gmail.com. Their staff speak Armenian, Russian, and English.

HIV health care in Austria

HIV care and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. All primary healthcare is free-of-charge, as is secondary healthcare provided in non-profit outpatient clinics and hospitals.

Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in Ukrainian and English. Austria AIDS Hilfe has provided a list of HIV outpatient clinics in Vienna, in Ukrainian, German, and English. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, German, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Austria AIDS Hilfe is a non-governmental organisation that provides advice and support to people living with HIV, either in person at their centre in Vienna or over the phone. There is more information for refugees on their website, in Ukrainian, Russian, German, English, and French. Their helpline is +43 1 59937, in English or German. They can offer a Ukrainian or Russian interpreter service if required, just email office@aids-hilfe-wien.at with your language needs and they will contact you to arrange an appointment.

The Addiction Counselling Centre CIRCLE can provide support in accessing harm reduction services and opioid substitution therapy. There is further information and contact details on their website, in German.

There is general information for Ukrainian refugees in Austria available from the UN Refugee Agency and from the Austrian government, in German and English. The non-governmental organisation Integration House has general information for Ukrainian refugees in Vienna on its website, in German, Ukrainian, Russian and English.

HIV health care in Belarus

Availability and accessibility of health services in Belarus are dependent on immigration status. For foreign citizens who are only temporarily staying in Belarus, healthcare including HIV treatment must be paid for through an insurance policy or borne by the individual. If you have been granted refugee status, you can access healthcare including HIV treatment free-of-charge. The same applies to Ukrainian citizens who have lived in the Donetsk or Luhansk regions for at least a year and are applying for temporary or permanent residence permits.

For more information and to gain support in accessing treatment, contact Positive Movement or People PLUS. These are non-governmental organisations supporting people living with HIV in Belarus, including refugees and migrants. They can also offer counselling and peer support.

There is also general information on where to seek help and how to apply for asylum on the UNHCR Belarus website.

HIV health care in Belgium

HIV care and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Those who have been granted temporary protection status can access public healthcare free-of-charge, including antiretroviral therapy. There is further information about accessing healthcare here, in Flemish, French, and Dutch – some information is provided in Ukrainian and Russian.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The European Test Finder lists TB treatment services in Belgium, in Ukrainian, Russian, French, English and other languages.

AIDS Prevention Platform (Plateforme Prevention Sida) is a non-governmental organisation that provides support to people living with HIV. Exaequo offers support to gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, including help to access HIV treatment or PrEP.

The Belgian government has created a website providing information to Ukrainian refugees on a range of issues, including accommodation, legal advice, and psychosocial support. Information is provided in multiple languages, including Ukrainian and Russian.

HIV health care in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Bulgaria

Health services, including HIV care, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Those with temporary protection status can access services free-of-charge, including antiretroviral therapy. The Bulgarian government has provided more information and a list of HIV and TB treatment centres here, in Ukrainian, Russian, Bulgarian, and English. Contact details of HIV medical services are also available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian.

Checkpoint Sofia is offering support countrywide to Ukrainian refugees. They can provide HIV testing and referral to care, psychological support in English and Russian, and consultations (in English) with infectious disease doctors and gynaecologists. Single Step Foundation can also offer countrywide support for people living with HIV and LGBT+ people.

Methadone is available free to people with temporary protection status, but buprenorphine is not. The Mental Health and Addiction Prevention Directorate is responsible for providing opioid substitution therapy. For further advice on accessing care, it is best to speak to one of the non-governmental organisations listed above or contact the government helpline for Ukrainian refugees on (02) 9055555 or (+380) 322465075.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

There is more general information for Ukrainian refugees on the government website, including a list of non-governmental organisations providing support to refugees in different regions.

HIV health care in Croatia

Health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Those who have been granted temporary protection status can access public healthcare free-of-charge, including HIV treatment.

There is only one treatment centre for HIV and hepatitis in Croatia – the University Hospital for Infectious Diseases "Dr. Fran Mihaljević", based in Zagreb. There is further information on their website, in Croatian. Contact details are also available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

ISKORAK are a non-governmental organisation that support LGBT+ people and people living with HIV. They can provide support in accessing treatment, counselling, and legal advice. They can help in person at their centre in Zagreb, over the phone (+385 91 2444 666), or by emailing info@iskorak.hr.

Opioid substitution therapy and other harm reduction services are available in Croatia. FLIGHT in Zagreb, Terra in Rijeka, and the HELP association in Split, are all non-governmental organisations providing support to people who use drugs. They can provide support in accessing harm reduction services.

Glossary

therapy

Any form of treatment. Drugs, radiation, and psychiatric counselling are forms of therapy. 

tuberculosis (TB)

A disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There are two forms of TB: latent TB infection and TB disease (active TB). In people with HIV, TB is considered an AIDS-defining condition. 

 

opioid substitution therapy (OST)

Providing users of an illegal drug (such as heroin) with a replacement drug (such as methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) under medical supervision. This helps the person reduce the frequency of injections and their dependency on illegal drugs. It is part of a harm reduction approach.

 

 

harm reduction

Harm reduction is a set of practical strategies and ideas aimed at reducing negative consequences associated with drug use (including safer use, managed use and abstinence). It is also a movement for social justice built on a belief in, and respect for, the rights of people who use drugs.

association

An association means that there is a statistical relationship between two variables. For example, when A increases, B increases. An association means that the two variables change together, but it doesn't necessarily mean that A causes B. The relationship isn't necessarily causal.

The Croatian government has created a website with information on legal, medical, and social assistance for refugees from Ukraine, in Croatian and Ukrainian. This includes information on how to apply for temporary protection status. You can also find more general information for refugees on the UNHCR Croatia website.

The Croatian Red Cross are coordinating services and support for Ukrainian refugees. There is information in Ukrainian here about where to access their support.

The Croatian Law Centre has also produced a leaflet giving guidance on applying for temporary protection in Ukrainian and Russian. You can access further legal information on their website (in Croatian) or by calling their 24/7 hotline (+385 91 23 555 22). Legal advice is also available via phone number 01/ 4854 934 or by emailing hpc@hpc.hr.

HIV health care in Cyprus

HIV care and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Those who have been granted temporary protection status can access public healthcare free-of-charge, including antiretroviral therapy.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The AIDS Solidarity Movement is a non-governmental organisation and the main organisation working with people living with or at risk of HIV in Cyprus. They can support access to treatment and care and psychological counselling, amongst other things. Their staff speak Greek, Turkish, and English.

The main opioid substitution therapy available in Cyprus is suboxone (buprenorphine + naloxone). Methadone is only available for detoxification. There are five treatment programmes across the country – for further information and linkage to care, contact Christos Krasidis (he/him) from the Cyprus AIDS Solidarity Movement on +357 95 100 625 or by email at christos@asmCyprus.org.

There is more general information for refugees arriving from Ukraine on the UNHCR Cyprus website, including how to apply for temporary protection, in English. The Cyprus Refugee Council is offering general support to new arrivals, their contact details are available on their website

HIV health care in Czechia

Health services, including HIV care, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Contact details are also available from Tadyted, in Ukrainian, Russian, Czech, English and other languages.

The Czech AIDS Help Society (Česká společnost AIDS pomoc) is a non-governmental organisation. It provides information in Ukrainian and Czech on how Ukrainian refugees can access HIV healthcare in Czechia.

Extra information, including details of harm reduction services and opioid substitution treatment, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English. The European Test Finder also lists HIV treatment and opioid substitution therapy services, in Ukrainian, Russian, Czech, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Other useful information for refugees is available from the Czech government (here and here), in Ukrainian, Czech and Russian.

HIV health care in Denmark

HIV and other healthcare are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. The Danish Health Authorities have developed informational material on accessing health care services in Denmark. There are PDF-versions of the key information in Ukrainian, Russian and English. This explains that when granted a residence permit (which all Ukrainian refugees should be able to obtain), one is assigned a primary care doctor. For primary care treatment or referral to hospital, Ukrainian refugees must contact their primary care doctor. The exception is medical emergencies where they should call 1-1-2.

For any undocumented refugees, The Danish Red Cross operates health clinics in the cities of Copenhagen, Odense and Aarhus. Further details are available in English and Danish on its website.

The main non-governmental organisation working with people living with HIV in Denmark is Aidsfondet. They can assist with information on how Ukrainian refugees can access HIV treatment and testing. They have set up a telephone hotline for Ukrainian refugees Monday through Friday from 10am – 2pm at +45 33 91 11 19.

Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Danish, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Estonia

Urgent medical care is available free-of-charge to people fleeing Ukraine, including antiretroviral therapy. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian.

The Estonian Network of People Living with HIV (Eesti HIV-Positiivsete Võrgustik) is a non-governmental organisation. It has information on its website on how it is supporting Ukrainian refugees, in Estonian, Russian, and English.

Contact details of hepatitis and TB medical services, as well as opioid substitution therapy, are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Estonian and other languages.

Methadone-based substitution therapy is available free-of-charge in Estonia, while buprenorphine-based substitution therapy (Subutex, Suboxone) must be paid for. Extra information, including details of harm reduction services as well as general support for refugees, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

LGBT+

The Estonian LGBT Association have information for LGBT+ refugees from Ukraine on their website, in Estonian, Russian, and English.

General support for refugees

Other useful information for refugees is available from the Estonian government here, in Ukrainian, Estonian, Russian, and English.

HIV health care in Finland

Health services are available free-of-charge via reception centres in Finland to people fleeing Ukraine with temporary protection status. There is more information about access to healthcare from the Finnish government here, in Ukrainian, Russian, Finnish, and English.

Treatment and care for people living with HIV is available free-of-charge, though the registration process for temporary protection may delay access, so it’s important to arrange this as soon as you can. For support in accessing HIV services, contact Positiiviset ry HivFinland who can provide direct support and help with referrals. There is further information and contact details on their website, and they can provide advice via their helpline in Finnish, Russian, English, and Swedish.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

There is also general information for Ukrainian refugees arriving in Finland available from the Finnish Immigration Service, in Ukrainian, Finnish, English, and Swedish.

HIV health care in France

Health services are available to people fleeing Ukraine with temporary protection status. All HIV care and medications dispensed by a hospital pharmacy are free of charge. There is more information about access to healthcare from the French government in French and Ukrainian.

Contact details for HIV and hepatitis medical services, as well as non-governmental organisations are available in French from the website of Sida Info Service or from their helpline (0800 840 800). Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, French, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Non-governmental organisations which can provide support to refugees living with HIV include AIDES (contact Stéphan Vernhes, svernhes@aides.org, tel +33 6 66 87 56 10), Coalition PLUS (contact Richard Stranz, rstranz@coalitionplus.org, tel +33 7 82 03 78 67) and Médecins du Monde (15 Boulevard de Picpus, 75012 Paris).

HIV health care in Georgia

Ukrainian citizens who arrived in Georgia between 1 February – 15 April 2022 are able to access certain public health services free-of-charge, including treatment and care for HIV. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Georgian, English and other languages.

The Georgian Harm Reduction Network is a non-governmental organisation that can provide support in accessing HIV treatment, harm reduction services and opioid substitution therapy. Their contact details are available on their website, in Georgian and English. The non-governmental organisation Real People Real Vision can also offer support in accessing HIV treatment and other HIV care in person or over the telephone. You can call them on 995555255580.

There is further information for people arriving from Ukraine on the UNHCR Georgia website, in English. There is also further information on help available on the Dopomoga Georgia website, in Ukrainian, Georgian, and English.

HIV health care in Germany

Health services are available to refugees from Ukraine on the same basis as other asylum seekers. This includes free-of-charge access to antiretroviral therapy and opioid substitution therapy. The easiest way to access support for HIV, TB, hepatitis and drug dependency is to contact an AIDS support centre, who will be able to refer you to the appropriate service. The addresses and contact details can be found on the Kompass website, in German and English.

Contact details of HIV treatment centres can also be found by searching the Dagnä website using your postcode or the name of the city you are in. Contact details of hepatitis medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, German, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

There is also advice and support available on the BerLUN facebook page, in Russian. BerLUN are a support group for Russian-speaking people who use drugs living in Berlin.

The non-governmental organisation Deutsche Aids-Hilfe has compiled a huge amount of general information for refugees from Ukraine, as well as information for specific groups such as LGBT+ people and sex workers, on its website, in Ukrainian, German, and Russian.

German Telekom are offering free SIM cards, calls, and texts as well as roaming for Ukrainian numbers through its network.

HIV health care in Gibraltar

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Greece

People forced to flee Ukraine have been granted free access to the Greek National Health System, including HIV treatment and opioid substitution therapy. A full list of the HIV treatment centres in Greece is available here, in English.

To access services, you must first obtain a social security registration number (known in Greece as AMKA). If you do not yet have an AMKA, or you are waiting to be issued one, you can access health services using your passport or a document issued by the police.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The non-governmental organisation Positive Life have established a new centre to support migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers. They can support with access to health services, including the application for a social security registration number. Their centre is based at Pittaki 4 (ground floor), Athens, 10554 and is open Tuesday to Saturday 12.00-16.00. They can also be contacted on (+30) 2103243133 or via email on info@refcheckpoint.gr.

HIV health care in Hungary

People with temporary protection are eligible to access health services, including HIV care, in Hungary free of charge. Those without temporary protection status should still contact HIV treatment centres to discuss treatment options, and the National Health Fund is discussing plans to make ART freely available.

Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Contact details of services for HIV medical services, TB medical services and opioid substitution therapy are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Hungarian, English and other languages. There is further information, in English, on access to HIV treatment and harm reduction services including opioid substitution therapy, from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Most doctors cannot speak Russian or Ukrainian, but translators are available to support access to healthcare (also listed on the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association website).

LGBT+

Budapest Pride are helping to provide accommodation for LGBT+ refugees from Ukraine. They provide further information and contact details on their website, in Hungarian and English.

General support for refugees

General information for refugees and signposting to further sources of support are provided by the Hungarian Helsinki Committee website, in Ukrainian, Russian, Hungarian and English.

HIV health care in Iceland

HIV treatment and other health services are available free-of-charge to people fleeing the war in Ukraine who have registered for collective protection. There is further information from the Icelandic government here on how to apply for collective protection, in Ukrainian, English and Icelandic.

To access health services, you should go to the reception center in Egilsgata 3 in Reykjavik to request a doctor's appointment. HIV Iceland is a non-governmental organisation that provides support to people living with HIV. They can give advice on where to access to treatment and provide psychosocial support and other care.

Flottafólk is a refugee centre set up specifically for Ukrainians. Their website includes information and useful links to services, in multiple languages including Ukrainian and Russian. They can also provide general advice and support at their two centres, both based in Reykjavik.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Ireland

Health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine, including HIV medication, prescriptions, tests and care. There is more information about access to healthcare from the Irish government here, in Ukrainian, Russian and English.

The non-governmental organisation HIV Ireland provides information on registering with an HIV clinic in Ireland as well as clinics’ contact details, in English. HIV Ireland can also be contacted on +353 1 873 3799.

Contact details of hepatitis medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, English and other languages. Contact details of harm reduction and opioid substitution therapy services are available from Drugs.ie, in English.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Israel

Refugees from Ukraine who are Jewish or eligible for Israeli citizenship can access free healthcare – including HIV care – through one of the country’s four health insurance plans. For refugees who are not eligible for health insurance, urgent healthcare is available for free via Terem clinics – this is unlikely to include HIV care, but some donated antiretroviral medications may be available free of charge from HIV clinics.

The Israeli AIDS Task Force is a non-governmental organisation which can link people with HIV clinics and may be able to locate a Russian-speaking clinician. To contact them, you can send an e-mail to: ws@aidsisrael.org.il or a WhatsApp message to +972 54-320-0077.

The Israeli AIDS Task Force can also provide support on accessing harm reduction services. Needle exchange programmes are available in Tel-Aviv, Ashdod, Beer-Sheva and Jerusalem. Methadone is only available from government clinics in Israel; there is more information here (in English) about the criteria for accessing methadone. A small number of private clinics provide buprenorphine for a fee.

Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, English and other languages.

There is general information available for refugees on the UNHCR Israel website, including contacts for helpful services, in Russian, Hebrew and English

HIV health care in Italy

Health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine free-of-charge, including HIV treatment and opioid substitution therapy.

The Ministry of the Interior have produced information for people arriving in Italy from Ukraine in Ukrainian, Italian, and English. If you arrive without ID, you can obtain assistance from the Ukrainian embassy. You are required to register your presence in Italy when you arrive at your local Prefettura – instructions are provided here (in Italian, Ukrainian, Russian, and English).

Once registered, you should be able to access HIV treatment at your local treatment centre, listed here in Italian and English. You will need to show your ID and passport to receive treatment. However, urgent healthcare is provided to everyone including undocumented migrants, so if you are lacking documentation or not yet registered, you should still be able to access HIV treatment. There is more information on access to healthcare for foreigners here, in English and other languages.

The Italian League for Fighting AIDS is a non-governmental organisation with offices across Italy. They can provide support in accessing HIV treatment, counselling, and linkage to harm reduction services. Other HIV support organisations include Asa Milano and Milano Checkpoint in Milan, ANLAIDS in Liguria, NADIR in Rome, Checkpoint Bergamo in Bergamo, and Checkpoint Ancona in Ancona.

You should also be able to receive opioid substitution therapy once registered with your local Prefettura. A list of providers by region is available here, in Italian. Extra information on harm reduction services, along with general support for refugees, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

Contact details of infectious disease centres for testing and treatment of HIV, hepatitis and STIs are available here, in Italian and English. Contact details of hepatitis and TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Italian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Milan Bar Association are offering free legal support to Ukrainian refugees as part of their Lawyers4Ukraine initiative. The UNHCR Italy website has further information for refugees arriving in Italy.

HIV health care in Kosovo

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Liechtenstein

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Latvia

People fleeing Ukraine are eligible for the same free-of-charge health services that are available to Latvian residents, including antiretroviral therapy. HIV treatment is provided via the Infectology Centre of Latvia. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Latvian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The non-governmental organisation Dia+Logs provides harm reduction services and support for people living with HIV. There is further sources of support and contact details on their website, in Latvian, Russian, and English.

The non-governmental organisation I Want To Help Refugees (Gribu palīdzēt bēgļiem) have created a website Ukraine to Latvia, which provides general information for refugees from Ukraine, in Ukrainian, Russian, Latvian, and English.

There is further information from the Latvian government on healthcare and psychological support available to Ukrainian refugees here and here, in Ukrainian, Latvian, and English.

HIV health care in Lithuania

Health services, including antiretroviral therapy, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, Ukrainian, Russian, Lithuanian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Demetra and RIGRA are non-governmental organisations. They can provide support in accessing HIV, TB and hepatitis treatment, plus harm reduction and opioid substitution therapy.

Extra information on harm reduction services, along with general support for refugees, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

The non-governmental organisation Dapamoga is coordinating general support for refugees from Ukraine, including emergency assistance and accommodation. To apply for help from Dapamoga, fill out this application form (in Russian).

People fleeing Ukraine can also apply for emergency accommodation via #StrongTogether (#StiprūsKartu), in Ukrainian, Lithuanian, and English.

HIV health care in Luxembourg

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Malta

People with temporary protection are eligible to access health services, including HIV care, free of charge in Malta. Information about applying for temporary protection is available here, in English.

Most HIV services are available from Mater Dei Hospital, located in Msida. HIV Malta is a non-governmental organisation that can provide support with accessing treatment.

Opioid assisted therapy is available in Malta. To be accepted for methadone treatment, you must first register at the Substance Misuse Out-Patient Unit at St. Luke’s Hospital in G’Mangia and undergo an interview with the house doctor. The contact number for the outpatient unit is +356 23885300.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Ukraine Community Crisis Centre is providing general support for people arriving in Malta from Ukraine. They have set up a 24-hour hotline, which you can reach on +356 99204051. There is more information here on the services they provide.

A list of other non-governmental organisations who provide support to refugees is available here, in English (it can also be downloaded in other languages such as French and Arabic from this page – scroll down to factsheet 21).

The Maltese Refugee Council is providing useful information and updates on the situation for people from Ukraine in Malta here (mostly in English).

HIV health care in Moldova

Health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine, many of which are free of charge. Those seeking HIV, TB or hepatitis treatment or opioid substitution therapy should contact the non-governmental organisation Initiativa Pozitiva who can provide support in accessing these services. Contact details of HIV medical services are also available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Details of HIV and TB medical services are also available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Romanian, English and other languages.

Extra information, including further details of HIV and harm reduction services, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

LGBT+

The non-governmental organisation GENDERDOC-M has information about the support they are providing to LGBT+ refugees from Ukraine on their website, in Ukrainian, Russian and Romanian.

General support for refugees

The Moldovan government have created a website Dopomoga, which provides general information for refugees from Ukraine, in Russian.

HIV health care in Monaco

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Montenegro

Temporary protection is available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine, which includes access to healthcare free-of-charge, including antiretroviral therapy. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian.

There is general information available for refugees from Ukraine in Montenegro on the UNHCR Montenegro website, including how to apply for temporary protection, in English.

Juventas provide support to people who use drugs, sex workers, LGBT+ people and anyone who is socially excluded. They can provide harm reduction services and support in accessing healthcare. You can call them on 38220624628 or email at info@juventas.me. Psychosocial support to people living with HIV, people who use drugs, and other marginalised groups is also available from Cazas NGO and the Montenegro HIV Foundation.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy. Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Serbian, Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian, English and other languages.

HIV health care in the Netherlands

Health services, including antiretroviral therapy, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine.

Refugees from Ukraine can travel freely to the Netherlands and stay without a residence permit for 90 days. The government’s temporary scheme entitles all refugees fleeing the war to reception, health care, the right to work and education for children. People should register at the town hall of the local council (gemeente) to register in the Personal Records Database (BRP). People who have officially registered as a refugee in the Netherlands will receive health insurance. Emergency care is always provided free of charge, even if you are not yet registered. More information about healthcare in the Netherlands is available from Zorgverzekeringslign, in multiple languages including Ukrainian, Russian and English.

General help for refugees, for example with shelter and healthcare, can be found from the website of the Dutch Council for Refugees and by telephone, in English or Ukrainian (+31 203007000). Other resources with information in Ukrainian and other languages include Takecarebnb, RefugeeHelp and the Red Cross. Refugees can send the Red Cross 24/7 a (voice)message via WhatsApp to +31 648158053 in Ukrainian, Russian or English. A volunteer will reply in their own language. Emergency reception centers are present at local councils in cities throughout the Netherlands and offer a place to sleep for every refugee from Ukraine: for details, see the website of the Immigration and Naturalisation Service.

For HIV help, the aware.hiv Ukraine initiative helps people fleeing the war to get direct HIV medical specialist advice and help with health services. Fill in the contact form on the aware.hiv website in order to be linked to Ukrainian and English speaking HIV medical specialists.

Contact details of the 24 official HIV treatment centres in the Netherlands can be found on the website of the Stichting HIV Monitoring website, in English and Dutch. These centres can be contacted directly to get HIV care.

Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Dutch, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Dutch HIV Patient Federation (Hiv Vereniging) provides information and support to all people living with HIV in the Netherlands. Information on access to healthcare is available in Dutch. Refugees can ask questions to Ukrainian and Russian speaking volunteers and get help with a referral to an HIV treatment center and get peer counselling.

HIV health care in North Macedonia

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Norway

Health services are available to people who have fled the war in Ukraine, although whether you have to pay for them or not can depend on your immigration status. There is more information from the Norwegian government here on access to health services for refugees and asylum seekers, in Ukrainian, Russian, English, and Norwegian.

HIV treatment and care is available free-of-charge to anyone living with HIV in Norway, regardless of immigration status. The non-governmental organisation HIV Norway (HIVNorge) can offer support and assistance to people living with HIV and groups at risk of HIV, including people who use drugs and LGBT+ people. Their main office is in Oslo but they can provide advice to people anywhere in Norway. You can contact them by telephone on 21 31 45 80 or by e-mail. Support for people living with HIV in Oslo can also be accessed through Aksept and Helseutvalget.

Contact details of TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Norwegian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

There is general information for people from Ukraine who are in Norway or planning to travel there on the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration’s website, in English and Norwegian (some sections are also in Ukrainian and Russian).

HIV health care in Poland

Health services, including HIV treatment and care, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine on the same basis as Polish citizens, although a Ukrainian ID or refugee document issued at the Polish border will need to be provided. You do not need to pay for medicines, tests or medical appointments.

Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian, or  from the National AIDS Centre, in Polish. Contact details of HIV, hepatitis and TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Polish, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Foundation of Social Education is a non-governmental organisation. They can offer psychological, social and legal support to people living with HIV fleeing Ukraine and have information in Ukrainian on their website about on how to access HIV healthcare in Poland.

Extra information, including details of harm reduction services and opioid substitution treatment, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English. The National Bureau for Drug Prevention has a list of opioid substitution treatment sites across Poland on its website, in Polish, and is running a telephone helpline, in Ukrainian and Russian, for people with drug and alcohol dependency.

LGBTI+

Lambda Warsaw have created a group for LGBT+ people from Ukraine and are offering psychological support to LGBT+ people in Ukrainian, Polish, and Russian.

General support for refugees

The Polish government has created a website with information on legal, medical, and social assistance for refugees from Ukraine, in Polish and Ukrainian. The Polish National Health Fund has further information on access to healthcare in Poland for people arriving from Ukraine on its website, in Polish and Ukrainian.

Psychological support is available for refugees from the Polish Migration Forum (in Ukrainian, Russian, and other languages) and the Ocalenie Foundation (in Polish, English and Russian).

Grupa Granica is a consortium of Polish NGOs supporting Ukrainian refugees. They have collated a lot of useful information for Ukrainian refugees in Poland on their website.

The Our Choice Foundation is a non-governmental organisation. It provides information on legal and social assistance for Ukrainian refugees on its website and via its hotline, in Polish and Ukrainian.

HIV health care in Portugal

Health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. HIV and hepatitis treatment is available free-of-charge to all migrants living with HIV in Portugal, regardless of legal status. People who have been granted temporary protection status can also access other public healthcare free-of-charge.

To get support in accessing health services, amongst other things, Ukrainian citizens in Portugal can refer to the four National Support Centres for the Integration of Migrants (CNAIM) in Porto, Lisbon, Beja and Algarve (contact details listed halfway down on this page), or one of the 140 Local Support Centres for the Integration of Migrants (CLAIM). Alternatively, you can go to your local health centre to ask about accessing HIV treatment. HIV consultations are usually carried out at a local hospital and antiretroviral therapy dispensed at the hospital pharmacy.

Grupo de Ativistas em Tratamento (GAT) is a non-governmental organisation based in Lisbon. They have produced a leaflet in Ukrainian with further information for Ukrainian refugees living with HIV in Portugal. They can provide support in accessing HIV treatment, counselling, and harm reduction services. Associação Existências provides similar services in Coimbra.

Contact details of hepatitis and TB medical services, as well as opioid substitution therapy are available from the European Test Finder in Ukrainian, Russian, Portuguese, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

There is general information for Ukrainians arriving in Portugal available on the Portuguese government website, in English and Portuguese. This includes information on how to apply for temporary protection. There is also further information on Portugal for Ukraine, another government website providing information in Ukrainian, English and Portuguese.

HIV health care in Romania

Health services, including HIV care, are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Details of HIV and TB medical services are also available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Romanian, English and other languages. Those accessing HIV treatment will need to present an ID card or passport.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Romanian Association against AIDS (ARAS), the National Union of Organizations of People Affected by HIV/AIDS, and Sens Positiv (contact: Alina Dumitriu - +40744682225, alina.dumitriu@gmail.com) are non-governmental organisations providing support to people living with HIV. ARAS also support with access to TB and harm reduction services.

Extra information, including details of harm reduction services and opioid substitution treatment, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

LGBT+

ACCEPT association are providing emergency assistance to LGBT+ refugees from Ukraine, including accommodation, legal advice and psychological support. They can be contacted by telephone on +40 770 613 630 (in Romanian and English) or by e-mail via help@acceptromania.ro (in English, Romanian or Ukrainian).

General support for refugees

Dopomoha provides general information for refugees from Ukraine, in Romanian, Ukrainian, English, and Russian.

The REGINA MARIA clinical network is offering free primary healthcare to all those fleeing Ukraine, including psychological support in Romanian and English (they hope to offer this service in Ukrainian and Russian soon).

HIV health care in Russia

There are a number of non-governmental organisations in Russia who are providing support to refugees living with HIV, regardless of nationality or origin.

The Steps Foundation can provide medical advice remotely via their hotline, in Russian. They can also provide face-to-face support for refugees and migrants living with HIV at their centre in Moscow (open 2-7.30pm on weekdays).

Life4me.plus can help refugees living with HIV access medication in Russia. They can be contacted in Russian, Ukrainian, English and other languages via email, Facebook, Instagram or Telegram.

The Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPCru) can provide support with accessing HIV treatment and testing services. They can be contacted via email.

Patients in Control can help Ukrainian refugees access antiretrovirals and testing; contact via their website (in Russian) or email.

New Life 96 can provide advice over the telephone (88005506841, 8(343) 2692009), in Russian.

You Are Not Alone provides HIV, TB, hepatitis and drug dependency support to refugees in Voronezh, while the Humanitarian Action Foundation does the same in St Petersburg.

Homeless offer support for the homeless and people in difficult social and legal circumstances at their centres in Moscow and St Petersburg, and remotely. They can be contacted via their website, in Russian.

LGBT+

The Sphere Charitable Foundation is providing social and legal assistance to LGBT+ people from Ukraine in difficult situations in the Russian Federation and territories bordering Russia. They can be contacted via their website, in Russian.

Anton Raguzin, based at the T-Centre, is providing free online counselling for transgender and non-binary people from Ukraine.

General support for refugees

The Civic Assistance Committee is providing support to refugees from Ukraine at their centre in Moscow. Further information is available on their website, in Russian, English and French.

Tong Jahoni provide legal aid for migrants across Russia. They can be contacted via their Facebook page.

HIV health care in San Marino

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

HIV health care in Serbia

HIV treatment and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine who have temporary protection status. There is more information from UNHCR Serbia on applying for temporary protection here, in English.

For information on accessing HIV treatment, contact RAINBOW Association (Asocijacija DUGA). This is a non-governmental organisation that supports people living with HIV. They can also provide psychosocial counselling and other support.

Association Prevent provides harm reduction services for people who use drugs and related groups, particularly sex workers. They can provide advice on where to access opioid assisted therapy. Please be aware that methadone is only available in some cities and you may be placed on a waiting list before you can access treatment.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

UNHCR Serbia has further general information for refugees on their website, including links to useful services, in English. In addition, the Serbian Commissariat for Refugees and Migrations has established an official phone line (+ 381 064 828 3171) and e-mail (kirsteam.ukraine@kirs.gov.rs) with information and resources for people arriving in Serbia in Ukraine.

HIV health care in Slovakia

HIV treatment and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Contact details of HIV medical services are available from the ECEE network, in English and Ukrainian. Contact details of services for HIV treatment, opioid substitution therapy and TB testing and treatment are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Slovakian, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Extra information, including details of harm reduction services and opioid substitution treatment, is available from the Eurasian Harm Reduction Association, in English.

Odyseus are a non-governmental organisation that can provide support to refugees in accessing HIV treatment and drug dependency treatment.

This website, coordinated by Human Rights League and Mareena, contains practical information for refugees from Ukraine in Slovak, Ukrainian, and English. There is also information from the Slovakian IOM Migration Information Centre on its website, in English and Ukrainian.

HIV health care in Slovenia

Health services are available free of charge to people fleeing Ukraine with temporary protection status in Slovenia, including antiretroviral therapy.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The non-governmental organisation LEGEBITRA can provide support to people fleeing Ukraine who need to access HIV treatment, hormonal therapy, and/or opioid substitution therapy in Slovenia. Further information about their services and contact details are available on their website, in Slovenian.

PLUSHIVISTI is a self-help group for gay men living with HIV based in Ljubljana and Maribor, who can also provide support in accessing treatment for HIV, hepatitis and STIs – contact details are provided on their website.

The non-governmental organisation STIGMA provides harm reduction services in Ljubljana, via its drop-in centres and mobile outreach teams. There is more information and contact details on their website, in Slovenian and English.

There is general information for refugees from Ukraine from the Slovenian government here, in Ukrainian and English.

HIV health care in Spain

HIV care and other health services are available to people fleeing the war in Ukraine. Those who have been granted temporary protection status can access public healthcare free-of-charge, including antiretroviral therapy. There is further information about accessing healthcare from UNHCR Spain here, in multiple languages including Ukrainian, Spanish and English.

There are numerous non-governmental HIV support organisations operating across Spain. They can provide support in accessing HIV treatment, counselling, and linkage to harm reduction services, and all are LGBT-friendly. They include AVACOS (Valencia), Apoyo Positivo (Madrid & Malaga), SOMOS LGBT+ (Aragon), Asociación Concordia Marbella (Marbella), and the Balearics Islands Association for the Fight Against AIDS (Mallorca and Ibiza). Also for residents of Mallorca and the Balaeric Islands, an AIDS Info line where people living with HIV can get advice. The number is 0900 204 2040, open Monday to Friday, 14:00-22:00, with advice provided in English and Spanish.

Contact details of hepatitis medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Spanish, English and other languages.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Spanish government has established a helpline for people displaced by the conflict in Ukraine, available 24 hours a day, at (+34) 91 047 44 44. The information service is available in Ukrainian and Spanish. There is further general information for refugees from Ukraine in Spain on the UNHCR Spain website, in multiple languages including Ukrainian, Spanish and English.

HIV health care in Sweden

Urgent healthcare is available to people fleeing Ukraine free-of-charge, including treatment for HIV, TB and hepatitis. A few regions are offering healthcare to Ukrainian refugees on the same basis as Swedish citizens, although this is not the case everywhere. HIV treatment is accessed through HIV clinics based in public hospitals across Sweden – if you need support in finding a clinic or accessing care, please contact the non-governmental organisation Posithiva Gruppen. You have the right to request an interpreter when visiting the public clinic, and staff can usually speak English as well as Swedish.

HIV clinics can often provide counselling if needed, and other social support for people living with HIV is available from Posithiva Gruppen and Noaks Ark, which both have local branches across Sweden.

Access to opioid substitution therapy (called LARO in Sweden) may be more difficult than treatment for HIV or TB. If you are receiving ongoing treatment and need a refill, it is best to contact your nearest emergency centre for people who use drugs (called Beroendeakuten) and they can direct you to the right clinic (which may vary by region). These centres can also support you to access needles and syringe provision. Opioid substitution therapy centres' contact details can also be found on the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, Swedish, English and other languages. The Test Finder also includes details of hepatitis medical services.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The Swedish Refugee Law Centre is a non-governmental organisation. It has provided a list of frequently asked questions about immigration status for Ukrainians in Sweden, in Ukrainian, Russian and many other languages. There is also further information for Ukrainian refugees available from the Swedish government, in English and Swedish.

HIV health care in Switzerland

The Swiss Federal Council are providing people fleeing Ukraine with temporary protection status, which includes health insurance coverage. In practical terms, this means you can access health services free-of-charge in Switzerland, but only once you have applied for and been granted temporary protection status. However, if you require immediate medical assistance and do not have temporary protection status or health insurance, the public authorities will cover the cost.

The Swiss AIDS Federation is an umbrella organisation of non-governmental organisations supporting people living with HIV. They have provided information for people arriving in Switzerland from Ukraine on their website, in Ukrainian, Russian, English, German, French, and Italian. This includes information on where you can access support and treatment for HIV, hepatitis, TB, and drug dependency.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Contact details of hepatitis and TB medical services are available from the European Test Finder, in Ukrainian, Russian, German, French, Italian, English and other languages.

There is more general information for Ukrainian refugees from the State Secretariat for Migration on their website, in Ukrainian, Russian, and English. The Swiss Refugee Council have also provided further guidance on their website, also in Ukrainian, Russian, and English.

HIV health care in Turkey

Access to treatment for HIV is complex in Turkey, and you may have to pay for treatment. The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

Positive Living Association is a non-governmental organisation providing non-stigmatising and confidential support to people living with HIV in Turkey. They can support you to access antiretroviral therapy as well as providing counselling and legal advice. There is more information on the services they are providing to people fleeing Ukraine and contact details here, in English, Ukrainian and Turkish.

ASAM provide legal advice and support to refugees in Turkey. There are contact details on their website for their various offices across the country, in Turkish.

HIV health care in the United Kingdom

All health services are available free of charge through the National Health Service to people fleeing Ukraine, including antiretroviral therapy. Some information on using health services is available from the National AIDS Trust in Ukrainian. You can use NAM’s service finder (in English) to find your nearest HIV clinic. The Terrence Higgins Trust is a non-governmental organisation that provides advice and support to people living with HIV via its helpline THT Direct. They can help you find your nearest clinic and refer you to local support.

You can find details of drugs services, including those providing opioid substitution therapy, on the FRANK website. You can also search for information on where to access free naloxone, needles and syringes on the We Are With You website using your postcode or the name of the town you are in. These services are also free of charge.

The Treatment4Ukraine website provides information in English and Ukrainian on legal rights for people fleeing the war and access to healthcare services, including for HIV, hepatitis, TB and opioid substitution therapy.

The British Red Cross is providing support to refugees from Ukraine in the UK, including psychological support and legal assistance. They have further information and advice on their website, in English, Ukrainian, and Russian. Information on legal rights for migrants is available in English, Ukrainian and Russian from the Migrants’ Rights Network.

Acknowledgements

This page is a work in progress, and will be updated regularly. If you have any information to add or have suggestions to make the page more useful, please email info@nam.org.uk.

Thanks to everyone who has shared information, including Dr Hazal Albayrak-Ucak, Sylvie Beaumont, Dr Sanjay Bhagani, Cæcilie Bom Kahama, Lella Cosmo, Dr Andrew Hill, Anastasia Homeniuk, Karin Laine, Dr Giota Lourida, Professor Jean-Michel Molina, Oğuzhan Nuh, Dr Nina Rise, Dr Casper Rokx, Dr Luba Tau, Dr Marta Vasylyev, Joëlle Verluyten and Dr Annemarie Wensing.

Thanks to the Ukrainian non-governmental organisation 100% Life for the Ukrainian translation, and to Stanislav Kazikin for the Russian translation. 100% Life have launched a crowdfunding campaign to help people living with HIV in need in Ukraine: https://network.org.ua/donate-en