Delstrigo

What is Delstrigo?

Delstrigo is a medication used to treat HIV. It is a combination of three separate antiretroviral drugs in one pill, taken once a day.

It combines 100mg of doravirine, 300mg of lamivudine and 245mg of tenofovir disoproxil in a yellow tablet with ‘776’ on one side of the tablet.

How does Delstrigo work?

Delstrigo combines three antiretroviral drugs in one pill. Two of the drugs (lamivudine and tenofovir disoproxil) are from a class of drugs known as NRTIs (nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors). The third drug, doravirine, is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Each drug class works against HIV in a different way.

The aim of HIV treatment is to reduce the level of HIV (the ‘viral load’) in your body until it is undetectable – usually less than 50 copies of virus per ml of blood. Taking HIV treatment and having an undetectable viral load protects your immune system and stops HIV being passed on to someone else during sex.

How do I take Delstrigo?

You should take Delstrigo once a day. Delstrigo can be taken with or without food.

HIV treatment works best if you take it every day, ideally at the same time each day. It may help to set an alarm, e.g. on your mobile phone, to remind you. If you forget to take a dose of Delstrigo and realise within 12 hours of the time you usually take it, take it as soon as possible, then take your next dose at your usual time. If you realise more than 12 hours late, don’t take a double dose, just skip the dose you’ve forgotten and then carry on with your normal routine.

What are the possible side-effects of Delstrigo?

All medicines have possible side-effects. It’s a good idea to talk to a doctor, nurse or pharmacist about what to expect before you start taking any medication, and how to manage any side-effects which occur.

A full list of side-effects, including less common side-effects, can be found in the patient information leaflet that comes with Delstrigo.

Side-effects can be described as:

  • Common – a side-effect that occurs in at least one in a hundred people (more than 1%) who take this drug.
  • Rare – a side-effect that occurs in fewer than one in a hundred people (less than 1%) who take this drug.

Common side-effects of Delstrigo include: abnormal dreams, difficulty in sleeping, nightmare, depression, headache, dizziness, drowsiness, cough, an irritated or runny nose, nausea, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, vomiting, hair loss, rash, muscle disorders, fatigue, fever.

Does Delstrigo interact with other drugs?

Glossary

cancer

A collection of related diseases that can start almost anywhere in the body. In all types of cancer, some of the body’s cells divide without stopping (contrary to their normal replication process), become abnormal and spread into surrounding tissues. Many cancers form solid tumours (masses of tissue), whereas blood cancers such as leukaemia do not. Cancerous tumours are malignant, which means they can spread into, or invade, nearby tissues. In some individuals, cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body (a process known as metastasis).

antiretroviral (ARV)

A substance that acts against retroviruses such as HIV. There are several classes of antiretrovirals, which are defined by what step of viral replication they target: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors; non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors; protease inhibitors; entry inhibitors; integrase (strand transfer) inhibitors.

undetectable viral load

A level of viral load that is too low to be picked up by the particular viral load test being used or below an agreed threshold (such as 50 copies/ml or 200 copies/ml). An undetectable viral load is the first goal of antiretroviral therapy.

drug interaction

When a person is taking more than one drug, and drug A interferes with the functioning of drug B. Blood levels of the drug may be lowered or raised, potentially interfering with effectiveness or making side-effects worse. Also known as a drug-drug interaction.

viral load

Measurement of the amount of virus in a blood sample, reported as number of HIV RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma. The VL is an important indicator of HIV progression and of how well treatment is working. 

 

You should always tell your doctor and pharmacist about any other drugs or medication you are taking. That includes anything prescribed by another doctor, medicines you have bought from a high-street chemist, herbal and alternative treatments, and recreational or party drugs.

Some medicines or drugs are not safe if taken together – the interaction could cause increased, dangerous levels, or it could stop one or both of the drugs from working. Other drug interactions are less dangerous but still need to be taken seriously. If levels of one drug are affected, you may need to change the dose you take. This must only be done on the advice of your HIV doctor.

You should not take Delstrigo if you are currently taking medicines from the following groups:

  • products that contain St John’s wort (a herbal remedy used for depression and anxiety)
  • carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin (used to treat epilepsy and prevent seizures)
  • rifampicin and rifapentine (used to treat some bacterial infections such as tuberculosis)
  • mitotane (a cancer treatment)
  • enzalutamide (a treatment for prostate cancer)
  • lumacaftor (treatment for cystic fibrosis)
  • nafcillin (an antibiotic)
  • telotristat ethyl (diarrhoea treatment)
  • lesinurad (anti-gout treatment)
  • bosentan (blood pressure treatment)
  • dabrafenib (skin cancer treatment)
  • modafinil (used to treat severe sleep disorders, chronic drowsiness).

Can I take Delstrigo in pregnancy?

If you are considering having a baby, or think you might be pregnant, talk to your doctor as soon as possible about which combination of anti-HIV medications would be right for you. It is important to take antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy to prevent passing HIV from mother to baby.

Delstrigo is not usually used by women who are pregnant or want to get pregnant as it has not been studied in women who are pregnant.

Can children take Delstrigo?

Delstrigo is not licensed for use in children.

Talking to your doctor

If you have any concerns about your treatment or other aspects of your health, it’s important to talk about these. For example, if you have any symptom or side-effect which may be from your treatment, or if you are finding it difficult to take your medication every day, one of your healthcare team will be able to help.

Building a relationship with a doctor may take time. You may feel very comfortable talking to your doctor, but some people find it more difficult, particularly when talking about sex, mental health, or symptoms they find embarrassing. It’s also easy to forget things you wanted to talk about.

Preparing for an appointment can be very helpful. Take some time to think about what you are going to say. You might find it helpful to talk to someone else first, or to make some notes and bring them to your appointment.

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