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New clues about viral rebound in Mississippi child thought cured of HIV

Clinicians involved in the care of a child many once hoped was cured of HIV have published details about the case in the New England Journal of Medicine. The authors found that the virus that eventually returned after the girl had been off antiretroviral therapy for more than 2 years was identical to her mother's viral strain. The case shows that HIV establishes a viral reservoir very soon after infection. Starting antiretroviral treatment a day after birth was not enough to prevent viral rebound, though it did appear to allow prolonged remission.

Published
23 February 2015
From
HIVandHepatitis.com
Biologist's Work on 'Viral Reservoirs' May Have Impact on AIDS/HIV

A drug used to treat patients with multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease has confirmed how “viral reservoirs” form in patients living with HIV and AIDS and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, according to new research conducted by Professor of Biology Ken Williams and colleagues from other universities.

Published
19 February 2015
From
Boston College Chronicle
The Search for a Permanent Alternative to HIV Drugs

Researchers Carefully Tailor a Study to Find Patients to Test Going Off Antiretroviral Medication

Published
16 February 2015
From
Wall Street Journal
New HIV Gene Therapy Shows Promise in Mice

Researchers were able to replicate the functional cure of HIV that was seen in the "Berlin patient" in a mouse model, according to a study conducted at the University of California, Davis.

Published
14 January 2015
From
The Body Pro
I Am the Berlin Patient: A Personal Reflection

My name is Timothy Ray Brown and I am the first person in the world to be cured of HIV.

Published
08 January 2015
From
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Elite controllers may pay a high price for their low viral load

About one in 200 people with HIV maintains an undetectable viral load and high CD4 counts without having to take antiretroviral therapy (ART). These so-called ‘elite controllers’

Published
07 January 2015
By
Gus Cairns
HIV vaccines should avoid viral target cells, primate model study suggests

Vaccines designed to protect against HIV can backfire and lead to increased rates of infection. This unfortunate effect has been seen in more than one vaccine clinical trial. Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have newly published results that support a straightforward explanation for the backfire effect: vaccination may increase the number of immune cells that serve as viral targets.

Published
04 January 2015
From
EurekAlert
New open-access journal in the rapidly developing field of virus eradication

The Journal of Virus Eradication is a new open-access online and print journal dedicated to the rapidly developing field of virus eradication. It is particularly interested in publishing original research on HIV, hepatitis viruses, HPV, herpes and flu but work on other viruses is also included. The first issue was successfully launched at the HIV and Hepatitis Five Nations Conference in London on 8 December 2014 and is available now on the Journal website: www.viruseradication.com

Published
23 December 2014
From
Mediscript
A Fresh Setback for Efforts to Cure HIV Infection

Researchers are reporting another disappointment for efforts to cure infection with the AIDS virus. Six patients given blood-cell transplants similar to one that cured a man known as "the Berlin patient" have failed, and all six patients died.

Published
18 December 2014
From
ABC News
Can AIDS be cured?

The fight against AIDS is following a trajectory similar to that of the fight against many cancers. When I was growing up, in the nineteen-fifties, childhood leukemia was nearly always fatal. Eventually, drugs were developed that drove the cancer into remission for months or years, but it always came back.

Published
17 December 2014
From
The New Yorker
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