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PrEP: So Effective, It's Unheard Of

As gay, bisexual and queer men and transgender individuals get more familiar with the drug, new possibilities continue to open up for us. Even so, the general heterosexual community has shown little excitement over this breakthrough -- even a widespread ignorance to the treatment's very existence.

Published
27 February 2015
From
The Body.com
HIV stigma drives sex work in Northern Kenya

When Zeinab left her home village in Northern Kenya to look for a job, she had one thing in mind; work hard to help her struggling family. But her plans were destroyed by something that would keep her from home for the rest of her life.

Published
27 February 2015
From
Key Correspondents
What We Know About HIV Transmission Should Influence PrEP Messaging

It is pretty clear that those who are diagnosed with HIV who are in care and on medicine are not spreading the virus. So why do people continue to discuss PrEP solely in the context of having known HIV-positive partners? And in what ways do we still stigmatize people living with HIV in our discussions around PrEP as a tool to bridge the viral divide?

Published
26 February 2015
From
The Body
New York Court: Not Disclosing HIV Before Sex Is a Misdemeanor, Not a Felony

An HIV-positive man who told a partner that they could safely have unprotected sex should face a misdemeanor reckless endangerment charge, not a felony, New York's highest court ruled Thursday.

Published
23 February 2015
From
New York Times
We need to rethink the relationship between forensic science and the law

Despite what we see on television, forensic science is not always easy to understand or simple to convey to a jury, many of whom may not have studied science since they were in school. When a case fails in the courtroom, maybe because the scientist was inexperienced, or there were flaws in the science presented, it creates the potential for a miscarriage of justice – something to be avoided at all costs.

Published
21 February 2015
From
The Conversation
Migrant primary care charge proposals shelved... for now...

Migrant rights campaigners can celebrate this week. It seems that ongoing lobbying has led the Department of Health to kick plans for new primary care charges for migrants into the long grass... Now we need to make sure they don't return in the autumn to haunt us.

Published
16 February 2015
From
Migrants' Rights Network
Dept of Health - Charging for primary care de-prioritised and postponed

At a meeting yesterday with the Visitor and Migrant NHS Cost Recovery Programme, the Department of Health announced that plans to extend and amend charging for visitors and migrants for primary care has been de-prioritised and will be subject to public consultation in autumn 2015.

Published
13 February 2015
From
Migrants Rights Network
Failed Trial in Africa Raises Questions About How to Test HIV Drugs

The failure of the VOICE trial of H.I.V.-prevention methods in Africa — and the elaborate deceptions employed by the women in it — have opened an ethical debate about how to run such studies in poor countries and have already changed the design of some that are now underway.

Published
05 February 2015
From
New York Times
Botswana: ‘Willful transmission’ clause getting HIV+ persons jailed

Botswana Network on Ethics, Law and HIV/AIDS (BONELA) Law Advisor Keikantse Phele says HIV positive people are at more risk of being judged unfairly in the courts of law as they have been observing a rising number of cases related to willful infection of sexual partners with HIV.

Published
04 February 2015
From
Botswana Gazette
HIV science and treatment knowledge can end AIDS epidemic in the US

The scientific evidence is clear. As a result of extraordinary advances in biomedical research, we now have the tools we need to end the HIV epidemic in the United States. Or do we? According to, "When We Know Better, We Do Better: State of HIV/AIDS Science and Treatment Literacy," a recently released national report by the Black AIDS Institute and others, the missing link to ending the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. is increasing the science and treatment literacy among the non-medical HIV/AIDS workforce.

Published
04 February 2015
From
News Medical
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