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Living with diagnosed HIV infection for a long time is associated with poor quality of life

Longer time living with diagnosed HIV infection is strongly associated with depression, anxiety and poor quality of life, according to UK research published in HIV

Published
10 February 2017
By
Michael Carter
Diagnosing Bed Bugs: A San Francisco HIV Clinical Dermatologist Dispenses Advice

In San Francisco, Amerson has seen evidence of a bed bug epidemic. Many of her HIV patients at San Francisco General Hospital live in densely-populated areas of the city and in large apartment complexes. “Once one apartment has bed bugs, the whole building has it. They’re very challenging to get rid of, and it’s a huge problem.”

Published
18 November 2015
From
BETA blog
Am I mad or is it the meds?

It’s 00:50 and once again I can’t sleep. My insomnia has kept me up for the best part of three days in a row now, my mind is tired, my body is exhausted and yet I still can’t sleep.

Published
07 June 2013
From
UK Positive Lad (blog)
Efavirenz and the brain: are we nearer to solving a mysterious side-effect?

One of the most potent HIV drugs, efavirenz, unfortunately also causes mysterious and sometimes chronic disruptions of mood, thought and sleep. Researchers may have found the key to

Published
22 October 2012
From
HIV treatment update
HIV doesn't increase the risk of insomnia

Many HIV-positive patients have insomnia or daytime sleepiness, investigators from the US military report in the online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. However, the prevalence of sleep disorders

Published
27 March 2012
By
Michael Carter
Fluctuating symptoms have major impact on quality of life and fitness to work, survey finds

Common but non-specific symptoms of uncertain cause can dominate the day-to-day life of some people with HIV, a survey by the National AIDS Trust has found. In many

Published
07 September 2011
By
Gus Cairns
Treatment interruptions explain higher HIV viral load in patients with depression and those who use stimulants

Inconsistent use of antiretroviral therapy is the main explanation for the higher viral loads observed in HIV-positive patients who are depressed or who use stimulant drugs, US

Published
08 February 2011
By
Michael Carter
Fatigue remains common in people with HIV, and often connected with social factors and mental health issues

The prevalence of fatigue amongst people with HIV ranged from between 33% and 88% in 42 studies examined in a review article in the online

Published
10 June 2010
By
Michael Carter
Symptoms still common in people with HIV, but rarely recognised by their doctors

HIV-positive patients have a high burden of symptoms, which are often unrecognised by their healthcare providers, US investigators report in the online edition of AIDS

Published
07 June 2010
By
Michael Carter
A chance to dream

Emmeline Ravilious discovers what the Sussex Beacon and EJAF are doing about sleep disorders.

Published
03 December 2009
From
HIV treatment update
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.