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Inactive Ingredients in Medications Cause Trouble for Some

Most approved medications have inactive ingredients that could cause problems for individuals with allergies or intolerances to those ingredients, researchers say. Those problems can add up when patients take more than one medication with troublesome ingredients.

Published
14 March 2019
From
Medscape (requires free registration)
Large French study examines neuropsychiatric side effects with integrase inhibitors

The largest prospective study to date on integrase inhibitors and their potential for being associated with neuropsychiatric side effects was conducted in France. With more than 21,000 HIV-positive participants, the study found that the proportion of people who stopped taking integrase inhibitors due to neuropsychiatric side effects was generally very low (between 1% and 3%). Of particular note is the fact that before starting treatment with an integrase-inhibitor-containing regimen, between 3% and 10% of participants had previously reported neuropsychiatric side effects with other classes of HIV treatment.

Published
12 March 2019
From
CATIE
Integrase inhibitor treatment leads to greater weight gain

More evidence that HIV integrase inhibitor treatment is associated with weight gain, and that people gain more weight after beginning treatment with an integrase inhibitor than people

Published
07 March 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Neural tube defects and integrase inhibitors: still waiting for stronger evidence

Researchers are still unable to determine if exposure to integrase inhibitors around conception and in early pregnancy increases the risk of neural tube defects in infants, research

Published
07 March 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Efavirenz and psychological performance in children living with HIV

Efavirenz remains a clinically effective and relevant antiretroviral drug for people living with HIV – but adverse side effects need to be screened for and monitored in children.

Published
15 February 2019
From
AVERT
Tenofovir Alafenamide Linked to Fanconi Syndrome

This case study is presented as a caution to clinicians that tenofovir alafenamide can cause Franconi Syndrome.

Published
12 February 2019
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
South Africa urgently needs an antiretroviral pregnancy registry

With the dolutegravir roll-out around the corner, the time is now ripe for patients and activists to demand a prospective pregnancy registry for the whole of South Africa. Whether it is a new endeavour or piggy-backs on international efforts is a matter for debate, but it is the only way we can answer the question of dolutegravir’s safety with the minimum number of women being exposed to the drug. It’s the least that patients deserve.

Published
29 January 2019
From
Spotlight
Six advantages of dolutegravir

Dolutegravir is a critically important antiretroviral medicine that is set to become the backbone of South Africa and many other countries’ HIV programmes. While the drug has recently made headlines because of a potential safety risk, most of what we know about the medicine indicates that it represents an important improvement over existing medicines.

Published
28 January 2019
From
Spotlight SA
South Africa: New safety concerns emerge on latest HIV wonder drug

New safety concerns have emerged about the HIV drug dolutegravir, which the government plans to roll out in April.

Published
18 January 2019
From
Business Day
Efavirenz in pregnancy is at least as safe as other antiretrovirals

An individual patient data analysis of almost 25,000 pregnancies in women living with HIV has found that the rate of birth defects following exposure to efavirenz was

Published
17 January 2019
By
Roger Pebody
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.