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Side-effects news

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Dolutegravir Use During Pregnancy: What Are the Risks?

Infectious Disease Advisor spoke to Rebecca M. Zash, MD, a co-investigator of the interim analysis by the Tsepamo Study in Botswana, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in July.

Published
18 hours ago
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
Wide range of views about switching to weekly, monthly or biannual ART

Two-thirds of people taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) would be interested in switching to a once-weekly oral regimen should it become available, according to American research published in

Published
15 October 2018
By
Michael Carter
Efavirenz, but not dolutegravir, linked to neurological problems in children

Children born to HIV-positive women who take efavirenz (Sustiva or Stocrin, also a component of Atripla) during pregnancy are at greater risk of developing neurological disorders, some of

Published
11 October 2018
By
Liz Highleyman
Efavirenz in HIV-positive pregnant women, risk of neurological condition in children

Researchers found children of women whose ART regimen included efavirenz were 60 percent more likely to develop a neurological condition, such as microcephaly (small head), seizures (from a high fever or other cause) and eye abnormalities than children whose mothers took other ART medications.

Published
05 October 2018
From
IDSA press release
Why the world may force women to choose: No birth control, no ARVs

A new drug could save 25 000 women living with HIV but could it come at the cost of their babies lives?

Published
22 August 2018
From
Bhekisisa
Neuropsychiatric side-effects lead only 1 in 40 to drop dolutegravir, French study shows

A large French study of people taking HIV treatment that contained an integrase inhibitor found that approximately one person in forty who started treatment with dolutegravir stopped

Published
22 August 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Diarrhoea continues to affect the quality of life of people with HIV in the modern treatment era

A meta-analysis of 38 clinical trials of antiretroviral therapies (ART) conducted in the past decade found that an average of 17% of study participants suffered from diarrhoea,

Published
07 August 2018
By
Roger Pebody
Dolutegravir: update on infant neural tube defects from Botswana

Dolutegravir treatment at the time of conception is associated with a higher risk of neural tube defects in infants exposed to the drug when compared

Published
24 July 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Dolutegravir preconception signal: time is up for shoddy surveillance

The news in May 2018 of a potential risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking dolutegravir (DTG) at the time of conception sent shockwaves through the HIV community. But, despite massive global investment, aggressive transition plans – as well as calls for years for more systematic recording of outcomes when women receive ART in pregnancy– few prospective birth registrieshave been established in other settings that can refute or confirm this finding. Meanwhile, women of child-bearing age, whether they intend to become pregnant or not, are being told that they must stick with (or go back to) efavirenz (EFV) – a drug that, before this news, was in the process of being replaced with DTG.

Published
16 July 2018
From
HIV i-Base
We Must Talk About Having Diarrhea. I’ll Go First.

My discomfort discussing anything butt-related is well documented, but this is important. Here’s why. One in five people living with HIV suffers from chronic diarrhea. That’s too many, and I happen to be one of them. Many of us figure that if the meds are working and we’re healthy, then gastrointestinal problems simply come with the territory. Remember the HIV drug Kaletra? What a nightmare.

Published
16 July 2018
From
My Fabulous Disease
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

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