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Treatment with modern antiretrovirals doesn't increase the risk of hypertension

There is no strong evidence that treatment with antiretrovirals significantly increases the risk of hypertension, investigators from the D:A:D study report in HIV Medicine. After taking into

Published
14 August 2018
By
Michael Carter
PrEP does not raise lipids or alter body fat, safety study finds

Using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) does not raise lipid levels or have any substantial effect on body fat, investigators from the iPrEX trial report this month

Published
15 February 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Diabetes in people with HIV over 50 overwhelmingly linked to old antiretrovirals, not age or body weight

People with HIV over the age of 50 are more likely to have developed type 2 diabetes if they started antiretroviral treatment before 1999 or

Published
03 January 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Lipids improved by switching from ritonavir to cobicistat as a booster for darunavir

Switching from ritonavir to cobicistat is associated with significant improvements in cholesterol and triglyceride levels for people with dyslipidaemia, investigators from Spain report in HIV Medicine. Ritonavir was replaced

Published
06 September 2017
By
Michael Carter
Switching from efavirenz to raltegravir leads to significant improvements in fatty liver disease in people with HIV

Switching to raltegravir from efavirenz is associated with significant improvements in liver steatosis for HIV-positive people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Spanish investigators report in

Published
17 August 2017
By
Michael Carter
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease common in people living with HIV – metabolic disorders are key risk factors

Over a third of people with HIV have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the absence of hepatitis B or C, according to the results

Published
12 July 2017
By
Michael Carter
High prevalence of low testosterone among younger and middle-aged ART-treated men in France

Around one in six young and middle-aged HIV-positive men doing well on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had low testosterone levels, French investigators report in the online edition of

Published
24 January 2017
By
Michael Carter
The benefit of treatment has outweighed the clinical impact of lipodystrophy, conference hears

The 2016 International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV Glasgow) heard today that over a 20-year period, people who suffered lipodystrophy (fat redistribution) and

Published
26 October 2016
By
Gus Cairns
Two Experts Discuss HIV, Abdominal Fat and Body Shape Changes

Watch TheBody.com's HIV and Aging Expert Nelson Vergel interview Dr. Stephen Grinspoon, Professor at Harvard Medical School and the Director of a Program in Nutritional Metabolism at Massachusetts General Hospital about the causes of body shape changes in HIV -- and most importantly, what you can do about them.

Published
24 August 2016
From
The Body
Middle-aged people living with HIV have an increased risk of frailty

Middle-aged people living with HIV have an increased risk of frailty compared with their peers without the virus, Dutch investigators report in AIDS. The association

Published
13 January 2016
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.