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Why the immune system fails to kill HIV

Our immune system contains CD8+ T cells which protect us from various diseases such as cancer and viruses. Some of them are specifically tasked with killing cells infected with the HIV virus – and researchers from Karolinska Institutet, together with international colleagues, have for the first time identified a key explanation for why these cells are unsuccessful in their task. In simple terms, the immune system's ignition keys have not been turned all the way to the start position, which would enable the CD8+ T cells to kill the cells infected with HIV.

Published
19 July 2014
From
Karolinska Institutet press release
Paper explores new theory on spread of HIV by "popular" cells

"Popular" cells - could there really be such a thing? According to a new opinion paper published in PLoS Pathogens, the human body may contain cells that have more contact with other cells and could be "superspreaders" of the HIV virus.

Published
11 June 2014
From
HIV / AIDS News From Medical News Today
Researchers trace HIV adaptation to its human host

In a new study that traces the evolution of HIV in North America, researchers have found evidence that the virus is slowly adapting over time to its human hosts. However, this change is so gradual that it is unlikely to have an impact on vaccine design.

Published
11 June 2014
From
Science Daily
Treating Leaking Gut May Slow Progression of HIV Disease

A kidney disease treatment successfully compensated for the effects of a leaking gut among monkeys infected with the simian version of HIV.

Published
11 June 2014
From
AIDSMeds
Low cholesterol in immune cells tied to slow progression of HIV

People infected with HIV whose immune cells have low cholesterol levels experience much slower disease progression, even without medication, according to University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health research that could lead to new strategies to control infection.The Pitt Public Health researchers found that low cholesterol in certain cells, which is likely an inherited trait, affects the ability of the body to transmit the virus to other cells.

Published
29 April 2014
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Early treatment reduces viral reservoirs but does not prevent rebound

Antiretroviral therapy started during the first several days after infection limited dissemination of an HIV-like virus throughout the body and establishment of cellular and tissue reservoirs in monkeys,

Published
21 March 2014
By
Liz Highleyman
First glimpse of how HIV swamps the gut's immune cells

We've been given the first glimpse of HIV in attack mode in the gut, shedding light on how the virus hijacks immune cells, multiplies and spreads throughout the body. A team of biochemists have used electron tomography microscopes to capture the high-resolution, 3D images.

Published
31 January 2014
From
New Scientist
How a House Finch Disease Reshaped What We Know About Epidemics

One team of researchers was able to study a highly virulent disease in House Finches. Their recent paper in PLOS Biology sheds light on what makes some disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, more harmful than others.

Published
30 January 2014
From
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Discovering where HIV persists in spite of treatment

Recently discovered T memory stem cells may be long-term viral reservoir, potential targets for future treatment.

Published
13 January 2014
From
Harvard Gazette
How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

HIV leads to AIDS primarily because the virus destroys essential immune cells called CD4 T cells, but precisely how these cells are killed has not been clear. Two papers published simultaneously today (19 December) in Nature and Science reveal the molecular mechanisms that cause the death of most CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues, the main reservoir for such cells, during infection.

Published
20 December 2013
From
The Scientist
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