Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

How HIV works news

Show

From To
Potential New HIV Therapy Seen in Component of Immune Cells

A research team led by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists has discovered a way to limit replication of the most common form of HIV at a key moment when the infection is just starting to develop. The study, published June 25 in Nature Communications, has shed light on a potential new element of human immunity against HIV-1 and could provide a powerful new strategy — perhaps as part of an HIV vaccine — to limit the severity of the disease.

Published
26 June 2015
From
Weill Cornell Medical College
Life as an Elite HIV Controller

After finding out that I was an elite controller, I felt a lot of confusion. I knew what an elite controller was, but that didn’t translate to knowing what it actually meant to be one. I wasn’t new to the HIV world—I had previously been involved in HIV research—but I felt like I knew nothing about what was going on in my own body.

Published
24 June 2015
From
BETA blog
Changes in HIV genetic code determine severity of disease

In a finding that furthers the understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), researchers from Children's Hospital Los Angeles discovered two locations where a single difference in HIV's genetic code altered the way the virus infected the cell, thereby influencing the progression of the disease.

Published
18 June 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Dendritic cells of elite controllers able to recognize, mount defense against HIV

Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have added another piece to the puzzle of how a small group of individuals known as elite controllers are able to control HIV infection without drug treatment. The research team reports finding that dendritic cells of elite controllers are better able to detect the presence of HIV, which enables them to stimulate the generation of T cells specifically targeting the virus.

Published
12 June 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Cheap blood test reveals every virus you've ever been exposed to

Cheap and rapid test allows doctors to access list of every virus that has infected or continues to infect a patient, and could transform disease detection

Published
05 June 2015
From
New Scientist
Transmitted HIV drug resistance is persistent but is not harming treatment responses in the UK

A study that looks at the genetic makeup of archived samples of drug-resistant HIV in the UK has found evidence that some drug-resistant strains of HIV are

Published
03 June 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Some chimpanzees infected with AIDS virus may harbor protective, humanlike gene

When Peter Parham’s postdoc first showed him data suggesting a gene in some wild chimpanzees infected with the AIDS virus closely resembled one that protects humans from HIV, he was skeptical.

Published
29 May 2015
From
Science
Acute HIV infection may present in many ways – sometimes as a serious illness

A Swiss study of people who were diagnosed during early HIV infection has found that a quarter of them presented or developed a wide variety of non-typical

Published
27 May 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Six questions about HIV/AIDS that deserve more attention

As HIV investigators work to control and eradicate the virus worldwide, certain myths or misconceptions about the disease have been embraced, whereas other concepts with merit have been left relatively unexplored, argues American HIV/AIDS researcher Jay Levy, M.D., in a Trends in Molecular Medicine commentary. He calls on fellow researchers to continue questioning and not to lose sight of alternative strategies that could ultimately lead to a sustainable, long-term solution to HIV infection.

Published
15 April 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
HIV spreads like internet malware and should be treated earlier

A new model for HIV progression finds that it spreads in a similar way to some computer worms and predicts that early treatment is key to staving off AIDS. HIV specialists and network security experts at UCL noticed that the spread of HIV through the body using two methods -- via the bloodstream and directly between cells -- was similar to how some computer worms spread through both the internet and local networks respectively to infect as many computers as possible.

Published
07 April 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
← First12345...30Next →

Filter by country