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Hepatitis C transmission and prevention news

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Harm reduction approaches predicted to reduce rates of new hepatitis C infection for people who inject drugs

A combination of providing clean needles and syringes and offering safer oral therapy, such as methadone, reduced the predicted risk of becoming infected with hepatitis C virus by 71%. Providing both services to people who inject drugs was likely to be cost-effective and has the potential to be cost-saving in some parts of the UK, depending on the size of the local population of people who inject drugs and underlying rates of infection.

Published
08 December 2017
From
National Institute for Health Research
How Drug Users Would Solve the Opioid Crisis

Users say they want to end prohibition, seek reparations, and get invested in pain alternatives like weed. In Vancouver, that’s already happening.

Published
15 November 2017
From
Vice
Hepatitis C test-and-treat programme reduces HCV by two-thirds among men who have sex with men in Swiss HIV Cohort

A systematic policy of test-and-treat cured 99% of men who have sex with men with hepatitis C in the Swiss HIV Cohort in an 8-month period and

Published
30 October 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
High rate of hepatitis C reinfection in German men who have sex with men

Around one in seven gay and bisexual men cured of hepatitis C at major treatment centres in Germany has become reinfected since 2014, according to findings from

Published
28 October 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
HCV infection is rising among HIV-positive gay men in San Diego

Hepatitis C incidence is increasing among gay and bisexual men living with HIV in San Diego, according to the largest analysis of its kind done in the

Published
24 October 2017
By
Liz Highleyman
Another outbreak related to the nation's opioid crisis: hepatitis C

The nation’s opioid epidemic has unleashed a secondary outbreak: the rampant spread of hepatitis C. New cases of the liver disease have nearly tripled nationwide in just a few years, driven largely by the use of needles among drug users in their 20s and 30s, spawning a new generation of hepatitis C patients..

Published
18 October 2017
From
Washington Post
Does drug injection equipment other than syringes transmit hepatitis C?

Sharing drug preparation paraphernalia may not significantly contribute to hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs, according to a study recently published in The Journal

Published
20 September 2017
By
Liz Highleyman
Sharing injection paraphernalia does not lead to HCV transmission

New findings suggest that sharing paraphernalia used to cook and prepare injection drugs does not directly lead to transmission of hepatitis C virus.

Published
24 August 2017
From
Healio
Men on PrEP & HIV-positive men are getting hepatitis C during sex—here’s why

Hepatitis C is best known as an infection transmitted by blood, with most new cases of hepatitis C caused by sharing injection drug use equipment. But this dangerous infection, which … Read More →

Published
18 August 2017
From
BETA blog
Contaminated blood scandal: Theresa May orders inquiry

Inquiry to look into deaths of 2,400 people after thousands were infected with hepatitis C and HIV in 1970s and 80s.

Published
11 July 2017
From
The Guardian
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.