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Sowetan runs unethical ad

The Sowetan seems to have forgotten that as a widely read publication it has an ethical responsibility to feature correct and accurate HIV information—even when it comes to advertisements. The newspaper has chosen to run a full-page advertisement selling an “immune system builder” of dubious credibility.

Published
09 November 2012
From
JournAIDS
Phase out D4T in poor countries

D4T used to be prescribed at 40mg but was reduced to 30mg to reduce side-effects. But even at this reduced dose many patients cannot tolerate it. So do we really need a new study to look at a lower dose (20 mg) of D4T than the current one? Many people living with HIV around the world feel that we do not and that we should plan to phase out this drug completely as has been done in Europe and the United States.

Published
07 November 2012
From
Quackdown
Death rates elevated at all CD4 counts below 500 in sub-Saharan Africa

A comparison of death rates between the HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners in serodiscordant couples in sub-Saharan Africa has found significantly higher death rates in people with HIV

Published
06 November 2012
By
Keith Alcorn
Brief Treatment Interruptions for Cure Studies Are Safe, Well-Tolerated

Short treatment interruptions of HIV antiretroviral regimens are both safe and well-tolerated, which is good news for scientists pursuing functional cures. 

Published
05 November 2012
From
AIDSMeds
Is protease inhibitor monotherapy sufficient to keep HIV under control in the brain?

Researchers in Sweden and Switzerland have been conducting clinical trials of PI monotherapy and HIV-related neurological research. Recently, two teams have separately reported that their data strongly suggest that injury to cells within the brain has occurred in some participants when exposed to PI monotherapy. The Swedish team recommends that PI monotherapy be used cautiously until further clinical trials are completed and more detailed information on the brain health of participants becomes available.

Published
02 November 2012
From
CATIE
Gilead: HIV drug meets key Phase 2 trial objective

Gilead Sciences Inc. said a Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating its HIV-1 infection treatment met its primary objective, allowing the company to push forward with its study of the drug. The trial for tenofovir alafenamide fumarate, or TAF, compared a a once-daily single tablet regimen of TAF combined with other drugs against Stribild.

Published
31 October 2012
From
Gilead press release
South Africa: Surviving On an Empty Stomach

Nombulelo Manala Lubhelu (45) of Lusikisiki-kwaGqwarhu location has taken the tough decision of declining lifesaving antiretrovirals (ARVs) because she is simply too poor to buy food and does not want to take her medication on an empty stomach.

Published
31 October 2012
From
AllAfrica
Updated EACS Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines

Version 6.1 of the EACS Guidelines (dated August 2012) is now available. This includes a substantial overview of the Co-infection section as well as a few minor changes to the Treatment section, in particular the inclusion of RPV in the “Initial combination regimen for antiretroviral-naive adult patients" table (p. 13), changes to the "Treatment of HIV pregnant women" table (p. 17) and revised indications for EFV and rifampicin (p. 18).

Published
30 October 2012
From
European AIDS Clinical Society
Adverse birth outcomes more frequent in women exposed to ART during pregnancy, largest-ever study confirms

Among HIV-infected women in Botswana, starting combination antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk for adverse birth outcomes, including pre-term delivery, small for gestational age,

Published
30 October 2012
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
For many destitute Kenyans, illegal sales of anti-HIV drugs only means of survival

The illegal sale of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs that curb HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is rampant in Kenya. Patients who receive the drugs for free under international aid programs are selling them to wealthy people who want to keep their HIV secret, or to those elsewhere in Africa who face difficulties obtaining the medication.

Published
29 October 2012
From
The Asahi Shimbun

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