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Cardiovascular disease news

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Smokers with HIV doing well on treatment now at greater risk of lung cancer than AIDS

People living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment with fully suppressed viral load who smoke are much more likely to die of lung cancer than HIV-related

Published
19 September 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Heavy Marijuana Use Tied to Midlife Cardiovascular Events in U.S. Men With HIV

Heavy marijuana use more than doubled the odds of a cardiovascular event in 40- to 60-year-old men with HIV infection enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The link between heavy marijuana use and cardiovascular disease was independent of viral load, cigarette smoking and other classic cardiovascular risk factors.

Published
13 September 2017
From
The Body Pro
Lipids improved by switching from ritonavir to cobicistat as a booster for darunavir

Switching from ritonavir to cobicistat is associated with significant improvements in cholesterol and triglyceride levels for people with dyslipidaemia, investigators from Spain report in HIV Medicine. Ritonavir was replaced

Published
06 September 2017
By
Michael Carter
Why Do Women With HIV Have a Higher Heart Attack Risk Than Men?

Research findings point to how far we still have to go to understand—and intervene in—the cardiovascular risk in women living with HIV.

Published
22 August 2017
From
Medscape (requires free registration)
People with HIV are at risk for liver fibrosis and steatosis

Metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity are risk factors for the development of liver fibrosis and steatosis (liver fat accumulation) in people living with

Published
21 August 2017
By
Liz Highleyman
Peripheral artery disease more common in people with HIV with lower CD4 counts

Peripheral artery disease, one of the most common forms of cardiovascular disease, occurs more frequently in people with HIV who have CD4 cell counts below

Published
15 August 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Switch from boosted protease inhibitor to dolutegravir reduces lipids in people with HIV at higher risk of heart disease

Switching from a boosted protease inhibitor to the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir was associated with lipid reductions in people with HIV at higher risk of heart

Published
09 August 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Many people living with HIV at high risk of cardiovascular disease are not on statins

Only half of HIV-positive patients at a Chicago clinic eligible for statin therapy according to the latest US guidelines are receiving this treatment, investigators report in the

Published
19 July 2017
By
Michael Carter
People treated with atazanavir had lower risk of stroke and heart attack

People who started HIV treatment with a drug combination containing atazanavir (Reyataz) were significantly less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke than people

Published
18 July 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease common in people living with HIV – metabolic disorders are key risk factors

Over a third of people with HIV have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the absence of hepatitis B or C, according to the results

Published
12 July 2017
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.