Search through all our worldwide HIV and AIDS news and features, using the topics below to filter your results by subjects including HIV treatment, transmission and prevention, and hepatitis and TB co-infections.

Cardiovascular disease news

Show

From To
Vitamin D deficiency reduces statin potency, increases risk of muscle pain in people with HIV

People living with HIV who take statins are less likely to experience cholesterol reductions and more likely to develop painful muscle damage as a side-effect

Published
18 January 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
HIV patients have nearly twice the heart attack risk

Current methods to predict the risk of heart attack and stroke vastly underestimate the risk in individuals with HIV, which is nearly double that of the general population, reports a new study. The higher risk exists even when virus is undetectable in blood because of antiretroviral drugs. Accurately predicting risk is vital for preventive treatment, say clinicians.

Published
22 December 2016
From
Science Daily
African Americans taking ART have high incidence of illness associated with risk of cardiovascular disease

Black HIV-positive men and women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) have especially high rates of health problems that can increase the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, investigators from the

Published
20 December 2016
By
Michael Carter
Co-morbidities are common and rising among people with HIV in the US

People living with HIV are increasingly experiencing a range of non-AIDS-related co-morbidities as the population ages, including cardiovascular disease, kidney impairment and bone loss leading to fractures,

Published
19 December 2016
By
Liz Highleyman
Stopping a Silent Killer: Know the Facts About Heart Disease and HIV

Heart disease rates among people living with HIV are elevated compared to the general population. If you add to that the fact that heart disease is often a silent killer with atypical symptoms, it is easy to understand why more research needs to be conducted on this subject.

Published
21 November 2016
From
Positively Aware
Omega-3 fatty acids may reduce triglycerides and improve inflammation in people with HIV

Long-term use of omega-3 fatty acid supplements was associated with reduced levels of triglycerides and the inflammation biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) in HIV-positive people with suppressed viral

Published
09 November 2016
By
Liz Highleyman
Smoking more harmful than HIV for people taking effective treatment, US study suggests

Smoking has the potential to shorten the life of a person taking HIV treatment by an average of six years, and is far more harmful to

Published
08 November 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
French study reveals the growing complexity of medical needs as people with HIV age

The complexity of the needs of people living with HIV will continue to increase as the population ages, and clinicians need to go beyond thinking about co-morbidities

Published
25 October 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
Heart- and age-related issues

New issue of TreatmentUpdate focused on cardiovascular health.

Published
12 October 2016
From
CATIE
Less than 100% adherence to HIV therapy, even with viral suppression, can lead to more inflammation and immune activation

Research involving men taking antiretroviral therapy, all with an undetectable viral load, has shown that imperfect adherence to therapy is associated with higher levels of key markers of

Published
12 October 2016
By
Michael Carter
← First12345...23Next →

Filter by country

Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.