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Weight gain with new antiretrovirals: It's complicated

South Africa’s next big shift in our antiretroviral programme is to replace efavirenz with a newish drug called dolutegravir. The Department of Health is pleased at the prospect of a safer, more robust and, amazingly, cheaper drug. But last year, the first reports surfaced that people using it were gaining weight.

Published
15 April 2019
From
Spotlight
The impact of older antiretrovirals on fat redistribution and cardiovascular risk factors may be irreversible

Fat redistribution in people with HIV who have ever taken thymidine analogues and/or didanosine (TA/ddI) can persist through time, while increasing cardiovascular risk factors, according to a Danish

Published
21 March 2019
By
Alain Volny-Anne
TB CAB statement on safety of using bedaquiline and delamanid together

he Global TB Community Advisory Board (TB CAB) welcomes the important finding from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Deliberate Trial that newer drugs bedaquiline and delamanid are safe to use together. These findings should erase any remaining reluctance to use these two important drugs together, as the benefits of these safer drugs outweigh the risks--especially for patients with drug-resistant TB who have few other treatment options.

Published
14 March 2019
From
TB Online
Integrase inhibitor treatment leads to greater weight gain

More evidence that HIV integrase inhibitor treatment is associated with weight gain, and that people gain more weight after beginning treatment with an integrase inhibitor than people

Published
07 March 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the risk of heart attack in people with HIV

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the risk of heart attack in people with HIV, US researchers reported at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

Published
07 March 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Sudden cardiac death is more common in people with HIV

Deaths caused by sudden cardiac arrest are significantly more common in people living with HIV than the general population and were more likely to be associated with

Published
06 March 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Experts tackle major cardiovascular issues in treating patients with HIV

Since the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infection has become more like a chronic illness. Now that patients are able to live longer and remain free of developing AIDS, they have begun to encounter new risks from age-related disorders common in the general population, including cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Published
05 March 2019
From
EurekAlert!
Stroke Recovery May Be Assisted by HIV Drug, Suggests Study of “Missing” Gene

Hints have been accumulating that maraviroc, a drug for slowing HIV, could benefit patients who have suffered mild stroke. A few years ago, maraviroc was shown to improve learning and memory in mice. And a new study, also in mice, indicates that the drug enhances motor recovery after stroke and improves cognitive function after traumatic brain injury.

Published
26 February 2019
From
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure are more important causes of disease than HIV in people living with HIV

Preventing smoking, lowering cholesterol, controlling blood pressure and curing hepatitis C would greatly reduce the burden of heart attacks, non-AIDS cancers and end-stage liver disease and kidney

Published
11 February 2019
By
Keith Alcorn
Cardiovascular Disease Events and Statin Eligibility in Patients With HIV

More patients with HIV who were not recommended for statin therapy experienced cardiovascular disease events compared with a control group.

Published
04 February 2019
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.