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Undetectable viral load and treatment as prevention news

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France: Highest Court confirms that people living with HIV with an undetectable viral load can never be prosecuted as the risk of transmission is nul

In a decision handed down on 5 March, the Court of Cassation ruled that it was impossible to prosecute an HIV-positive man on treatment who had sex without a condom and without informing his partner of his HIV status. That’s a first. In a decision handed down on 5 March, the Court of Cassation recognised the preventive nature of HIV treatment. Thus, any person whose viral load is undetectable, who has sex without a condom with another person without the latter being aware of the HIV status of his or her partner, cannot be prosecuted.

Published
5 hours ago
From
HIV Justice Network
‘I am prepared’: Steve Spencer on becoming HIV positive in the era of PrEP and U=U

"I don’t like to use the term ‘PrEP failure’ which is thrown around in these cases, because PrEP is anything but that," Steve Spencer says.

Published
5 hours ago
From
Star Observer
Reclaiming my time!

Every time I take my medicine, it is an act of preventing transmission, and survival. Never again will I see myself as ‘unclean’ or ‘a risk to others’. The only time HIV plays a role in my life is when I take my medication before bed.

Published
6 hours ago
From
PrEPing MALTA
Healthcare providers should discuss U=U with all their HIV-positive patients

Healthcare providers should inform all patients with HIV they cannot transmit HIV to a sexual partner when their viral load is undetectable, argue the authors of  a strongly

Published
18 March 2019
By
Michael Carter
U=U is a human rights issue

Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) is a human rights issue, Dr Carrie Foote told the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019) in Seattle last week. “All people

Published
12 March 2019
By
Krishen Samuel
Largest ever HIV prevention study delivers sobering message

The recipe for ending HIV epidemics seems straightforward. Introduce widespread testing. Immediately put those who test positive on antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, which suppress the virus to undetectable levels so those people won’t infect others. The number of new infections will drop, and the epidemic will peter out. But massive, costly studies done in the past few years have failed to show this strategy can reliably curb the spread of the virus, to the frustration of researchers.

Published
12 March 2019
From
Science
Multiple benefits to scaling up universal test and treat in Africa

As well as the important findings of PopART, the largest HIV prevention trial ever conducted, this week’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle heard about

Published
08 March 2019
By
Roger Pebody
The length of time Americans with HIV remain infectious is falling, but slowly

In 2016, more than half of people with HIV in the United States took more than three years to be diagnosed, and more than five months after

Published
07 March 2019
By
Roger Pebody
HIV infections lowered by 30% in universal testing and treatment study

Communities in southern Africa which received a door-to-door HIV testing intervention and support for linkage to care had substantially lower HIV incidence, the Conference on Retroviruses and

Published
06 March 2019
By
Roger Pebody
HIV prevention study finds universal 'test and treat' approach can reduce new infections

New HIV infections declined by 30 percent in southern African communities where health workers conducted house-to-house voluntary HIV testing, referred people who tested positive to begin HIV treatment according to local guidelines, and offered other proven HIV prevention measures to those who tested negative. Local guidelines evolved during the study from offering HIV treatment based on immune health to offering immediate treatment for all.

Published
05 March 2019
From
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.