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Neurological and cognitive problems news

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No change in cognitive function or brain structure in people taking effective HIV treatment for 2 years

People with HIV taking antiretroviral treatment who had undetectable viral load did not suffer any loss of cognitive function or brain volume during a two-year

Published
13 November 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Cognitive Impairment Risk Rises With Increasing Age of People With HIV

Researchers identified this advancing risk after controlling for expected cognitive decline based on age.

Published
20 October 2017
From
Poz
Chronic pain common in people living with HIV

HIVMA comprehensive guidelines recommend screening everyone with HIV, offering multidisciplinary treatment focusing on non-drug options.

Published
14 September 2017
From
EurekAlert
Case reports of severe dolutegravir-related depression

Severe depression can be a side-effect of treatment with the anti-HIV drug dolutegravir. In HIV Medicine, clinicians from the Netherlands report two cases of rapid onset of

Published
05 September 2017
By
Michael Carter
Few people with HIV starting raltegravir and dolutegravir change therapy because of side-effects

Only a few people starting an integrase inhibitor discontinue the treatment during the first year of therapy due to drug-related toxicities, investigators from Switzerland report in an advance

Published
21 July 2017
By
Michael Carter
People treated with atazanavir had lower risk of stroke and heart attack

People who started HIV treatment with a drug combination containing atazanavir (Reyataz) were significantly less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke than people

Published
18 July 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Is there HIV in my brain? Neurologist Dr. Joanna Hellmuth fills us in

Twice a month, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation program Positive Force hosts free The Dr. Is In events for people living with HIV in our community. This month, we invited Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, to share information about age- and HIV-related changes to thinking, memory and other cognitive processes. Here’s what we learned.

Published
21 June 2017
From
BETA blog
Researchers say rule out depression, anxiety, unemployment and other stresses before blaming cognitive impairment for everyday difficulties

One in five people living with HIV in a European study reported a decline in everyday functioning as a result of cognitive problems such as

Published
19 June 2017
By
Michael Carter
Risk score can identify which HIV-positive people with controlled viral load are at greatest risk of neurocognitive decline

Four factors are associated with neurocognitive decline in people living with HIV with an undetectable viral load, investigators from Canada report in the online edition

Published
16 June 2017
By
Michael Carter
Switching from efavirenz to lopinavir/ritonavir has no meaningful impact on neurological function, says UK study

Switching from efavirenz does not significantly improve the neurological function of patients taking virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy, investigators from the UK report in HIV Medicine. The

Published
10 May 2017
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.