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Smokers with HIV doing well on treatment now at greater risk of lung cancer than AIDS

People living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment with fully suppressed viral load who smoke are much more likely to die of lung cancer than HIV-related

Published
19 September 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Chronic pain common in people living with HIV

HIVMA comprehensive guidelines recommend screening everyone with HIV, offering multidisciplinary treatment focusing on non-drug options.

Published
14 September 2017
From
EurekAlert
Widely used diabetes test may not be suitable for Africans

People of African descent may mistakenly get the all-clear from a widely used type 2 diabetes test called HbA1c, according to an international study. The findings have important implications as they suggest that using this test as the sole means to diagnose diabetes would do harm, said University of the Witwatersrand endocrinologist Alisha Wade.

Published
14 September 2017
From
Medical Brief
Heavy Marijuana Use Tied to Midlife Cardiovascular Events in U.S. Men With HIV

Heavy marijuana use more than doubled the odds of a cardiovascular event in 40- to 60-year-old men with HIV infection enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). The link between heavy marijuana use and cardiovascular disease was independent of viral load, cigarette smoking and other classic cardiovascular risk factors.

Published
13 September 2017
From
The Body Pro
Bone Loss and Fracture Risk in Patients With HIV: What We Know So Far

In an interview with Infectious Disease Advisor, Todd T. Brown, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and epidemiology, division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, discussed the effects of HIV infection and ART on BMD, as well as management strategies for HIV patients at risk for fragility fracture.

Published
11 September 2017
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
HIV Survivors Give Their 'Last Gift' In A New San Diego Study

The Last Gift study at UC San Diego is a unique new research effort focusing on HIV patients with a terminal illness such as cancer, ALS or advanced heart disease. Participants must have a prognosis of less than six months to live. When they near the end of their lives, they stop taking their HIV medications and let researchers draw blood regularly to monitor the activity of the virus. They also consent to having their bodies autopsied within hours of death.

Published
11 September 2017
From
KPBS
Why HPV Vaccination Rates Remain Low in Rural States

The problem the vaccine has faced is its link to a taboo in American culture: sexual activity among teenagers. Health-care providers are the biggest hurdle to getting more children vaccinated.

Published
11 September 2017
From
MIT Technology Review
What is going on in gay men’s lives when they acquire HIV?

Gay men in England who have recently become HIV positive describe a complex web of factors which may have contributed to their infection, according to a qualitative

Published
08 September 2017
By
Roger Pebody
HPV researchers, Planned Parenthood win prestigious Lasker medical awards

The Lasker Awards, among the most prestigious in medicine, will go to two National Cancer Institute researchers whose work led to the development of vaccines that prevent cervical cancer, and to Planned Parenthood for providing “essential health services and reproductive care” to millions of women, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation said Wednesday.

Published
06 September 2017
From
Washington Post
Lipids improved by switching from ritonavir to cobicistat as a booster for darunavir

Switching from ritonavir to cobicistat is associated with significant improvements in cholesterol and triglyceride levels for people with dyslipidaemia, investigators from Spain report in HIV Medicine. Ritonavir was replaced

Published
06 September 2017
By
Michael Carter

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.