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329 NGOs call on world leaders to address the global health and human rights crisis among people who use drugs on the occasion of the 26th International Harm Reduction Conference

As civil society and global experts gather in Porto for the 26thInternational Harm Reduction Conference, 329 NGOs are calling on the international community to address the ongoing global health and human rights crisis among people who use drugs. The latest numbers on the HIV epidemic, just released by UNAIDS, are alarming. While global HIV incidence declined by 25% between 2010 and 2017, it is rising among people who inject drugs. Outside of Sub-Saharan Africa, people who inject drugs and their sexual partners continue to account for roughly one quarter of all people contracting HIV. Globally, six in ten people who use drugs are living with hepatitis C, while 168,000 people who use drugs were reported to have died of an overdose in 2015 alone.

Published
01 May 2019
From
International Drug Policy Consortium
People Before Politics: 4 Key Points in HR19’s Opening Ceremony

The Harm Reduction International Conference 2019 (HR19) has begun in Porto, with several influential speakers delivering inspiring and poignant remarks at the opening ceremony. HR19 comes at a crucial moment in the development of drug policies across the globe. Many countries find themselves at a drug policy crossroads; do they pursue health and human rights-oriented approaches that reduce potential drug harms, or maintain policies of criminalisation and repression that have long-characterised the global drug war?

Published
29 April 2019
From
Talking Drugs
New “Generic” Naloxone: Expect More Big-Pharma Sleight of Hand

It’s been less than two weeks since the US Department of Justice joined a string of lawsuits against Indivior—the maker of the drug Suboxone, which is used to treat opioid use disorder— alleging the company engaged in a fraudulent patent-hopping scheme designed to prevent cheaper generic versions of the drug (a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone) from hitting market. Now the Food and Drug Administration has set the stage for yet another legal battle over lifesaving medication—and if history is a guide, profits are likely to be prioritized over people.

Published
25 April 2019
From
Filter
FDA OKs First Generic Naloxone Nasal Spray for Opioid Overdose

The spray requires no medical training.

Published
24 April 2019
From
Poz
The Explainer: Why haven't any supervised drug injection centres opened in Ireland?

In this episode of The Explainer, TheJournal.ie‘s Cormac Fitzgerald and Christine Bohan delve into the current situation around supervised drug injection centres in Ireland, how Irish politicians have lagged behind on drug policy, the concerns expressed around opening the pilot scheme in Dublin city centre, as well as the facts behind their effectiveness. Listen via Soundcloud below or tap the buttons to listen on iOS or Android.

Published
23 April 2019
From
The Journal
Cocaine injecting and homelessness 'behind Glasgow HIV rise'

A rise in cocaine injecting and homelessness are behind a 10-fold increase in HIV infection among drug users in Glasgow, research suggests.

Published
10 April 2019
From
BBC News
HIV Incidence and Risk Behaviours of People Who Inject Drugs in Bangkok, 1995–2012

HIV incidence in people who inject drugs in Bangkok declined from 5.7 per 100 person-years during the cohort study, to 2.7 per 100 person-years in the vaccine trial, to 0.7 per 100 person-years among PrEP study placebo recipients. Incidence peaked at 12.1 per 100 person-years in 1996 and declined to <1.0% during 2005–2012. Several factors likely contributed to the decline, including decreases in the frequency of injecting and sharing, improved access to HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy, and the use of PrEP. Expanding access to effective HIV prevention tools can hasten control of the HIV epidemic among PWID.

Published
01 April 2019
From
The Lancet
Opioid overdose deaths are rising among people with HIV in the United States

A growing number of people with HIV in the US are dying from opioid overdoses, according to a presentation at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

Published
28 March 2019
By
Liz Highleyman
Promises to improve health outcomes for people who inject drugs remain unfulfilled as 99% do not have adequate access to HIV and harm reduction services

New report by UNAIDS highlights the urgent need to implement a human rights and evidence-informed approach to reach people who inject drugs with essential health services.

Published
13 March 2019
From
UNAIDS
Dramatic rise in U.S. opioid deaths as epidemic spreads to eastern states

Long believed to be concentrated among Appalachian states and parts of the Midwest, Alexander's research shows that the crisis has spread. Eastern states have seen a sharp rise in opioid deaths – with Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire and Ohio among the states with the highest rise in opioid-related deaths.

Published
13 March 2019
From
Medical Xpress

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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