Women: latest news

Women resources

  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Women may get bacterial vaginosis when the balance of normal bacteria in their vagina becomes disrupted.It is common and various activities seem to increase the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Contraception

    Your choice of contraception will depend on your situation and preferences.There are possible interactions between some hormonal contraceptives and some anti-HIV drugs. Your HIV treatment needs to be...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring during pregnancy

    If a woman has HIV, it is possible for it to be passed on to her baby during pregnancy or delivery, or through breastfeeding. For this reason,...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and having a baby

    Women living with HIV can give birth without passing on HIV to the baby.Your options for conception will depend on your health and your partner’s...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Having a baby

    Lots of people with HIV have had babies without passing on the infection. To do so, you need some help from your doctor.If you are...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • HIV & women

    The booklet is for women living with HIV. It includes information on wellbeing, HIV treatment, sexual health, contraception and pregnancy....

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV treatment, pregnancy and contraception

    When HIV treatment is used during pregnancy, it protects your health as well as playing an important role in preventing HIV being passed on from you to...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV & Pregnancy

    Personalised information about having a baby. (Smartphone version available.)...

    From: Resources

  • HIV & Contraception

    ...

    From: Resources

  • Pregnancy

    Since 1999 it has been routine for pregnant women in the UK to be offered an HIV test. The test was introduced in recognition of...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4
  • Mother-to-child transmission

    HIV can pass from an HIV-positive mother to her child:During pregnancy – the foetus is infected by HIV crossing the placenta.During childbirth – the...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4
  • Women's health issues

    Globally, HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among women aged 15 to 49 years. A majority of women acquire HIV as a result of unprotected...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Women features

Women in your own words

Women news from aidsmap

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Women news selected from other sources

  • Women left out of HIV services as they focus too much on gay men, charity says

    Public health experts interviewed by the charity "felt that overall there had been a disproportionate focus on men who have sex with men (MSM) in the HIV response with one stakeholder suggesting that the sector had ‘taken its eye off the ball’ when it came to HIV and women", the report said.

    10 April 2018 | Telegraph
  • Women and HIV: invisible no longer

    Women and HIV: Invisible No Longer was a one-year project led by Sophia Forum and Terrence Higgins Trust. It aimed to set out clear recommendations for policy and service development to ensure that greater focus is given to women affected by HIV.

    09 April 2018 | Terrence Higgins Trust
  • CROI 2018: Highlights and what’s next for advocates

    Historically, CROI is heavy on basic science and early-phase research. Data from these types of studies were still prominent in 2018, but this year the meeting also broadened its lens from the lab to the ways that different strategies are, or might, have an impact in the context of people's complex lives.

    27 March 2018 | AVAC
  • Menopause worsens fatigue, muscle aches in women with HIV

    Researchers at Columbia University found evidence that fatigue and muscle aches — two of the most common symptoms among patients with HIV — are exacerbated by menopause. Their study underscores the need for health care providers to consider menopause when treating the often-overlooked aging HIV population, according to Rebecca Schnall, PhD, RN, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at Columbia University School of Nursing, and colleagues.

    26 March 2018 | Healio
  • The Blesser's Curse

    How sugar daddies and vaginal microbes created the world’s largest HIV epidemic.

    23 March 2018 | The Atlantic
  • UN official questions ethics of sexual misconduct victims in bizarre speech

    UNAids chief takes aim at harassment whistleblowers and praises outgoing deputy accused of assault for taking the ‘high road’: Michel Sidibé, the director of UNAids, has attacked whistleblowers who raised concerns about the handling of a recent sexual harassment and assault case, apparently suggesting they lacked ethics and morals. Sidibé made disparaging remarks about employees who have spoken out, while praising as “courageous” the decision of his deputy, Luiz Loures, to step down following an unsubstantiated allegation of sexual harassment and assault.

    19 March 2018 | The Guardian
  • A daily pill can prevent HIV infections. Why don’t more people use it?

    Although millions of people around the world could benefit, only 200,000 are prescribed what’s called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, and 75% of them are in the United States. “I’m frustrated,” says Linda-Gail Bekker, a researcher at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. “We have nearly 1700 infections every week in young women and girls, and this might be a way to throttle this.”

    13 March 2018 | Science
  • Why a fulfilling sexual life with HIV matters

    As International Women’s Day approaches, I believe now, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a positive difference in sexual health and rights for women living with HIV. To do this, we need supportive social conditions in which women’s sexual needs and desires are not only respected but embraced. Although we pay most attention to preventing the transmission of HIV to intimate partners, women’s sexual concerns go far beyond condom use. We need to talk about the sexual changes they experience and how these individual vulnerabilities are linked to structural inequalities.

    09 March 2018 | The Conversation
  • Cash transfers reduce risk of intimate partner violence for young girls in South Africa

    Study finds that the risk of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) is reduced by giving regular cash payments to poor girls, but HIV infection rates are not affected.

    08 March 2018 | AVERT
  • Longstanding Mombasa Cohort helps answer questions about HIV risk and transmission

    This month, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center virologist Dr. Julie Overbaugh and her collaborators in Kenya and the U.S. celebrated the 25th anniversary of a unique group of HIV research participants — high-risk women in Mombasa, Kenya — who helped change the landscape of HIV transmission research.

    28 February 2018 | Fred Hutch
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.