Treatment simplification strategies: latest news

Treatment simplification strategies news from aidsmap

More news

Treatment simplification strategies news selected from other sources

  • Laura Waters, MD, FRCP: Can Two Drugs Tango?

    In a symposium presentation at the Annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2019), Laura Waters, MD, FRCP, discussed the developments of 2-drug regimens for HIV treatments, as well as the questions that remain unanswered. Contagion® sat down with Dr. Waters for an exclusive interview about her presentation and to discuss new data from several studies presented at the meeting.

    12 March 2019 | Contagion Live
  • Early ART in HIV Possible Key to Dolutegravir Monotherapy Success

    Several randomized controlled trials have shown dolutegravir monotherapy to be inferior to cART. These dolutegravir monotherapy trials, however, have been conducted in patients initiating cART during chronic rather than primary HIV infection. Since patients who start cART during the early phase of HIV infection show a reduced HIV reservoir and low viral diversity, the researchers evaluated whether these properties would allow for sustained virologic suppression after a switch to dolutegravir monotherapy.

    15 February 2019 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Six advantages of dolutegravir

    Dolutegravir is a critically important antiretroviral medicine that is set to become the backbone of South Africa and many other countries’ HIV programmes. While the drug has recently made headlines because of a potential safety risk, most of what we know about the medicine indicates that it represents an important improvement over existing medicines.

    28 January 2019 | Spotlight SA
  • Dolutegravir Monotherapy for HIV No Longer Recommended

    Dolutegravir monotherapy should no longer be used as HIV maintenance therapy, according to Bart J.A. Rijnders, MD, PhD, and Casper Rokx, MD, PhD, both from Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

    09 January 2019 | Contagion Live
  • Top 10 HIV Clinical Developments of 2018

    It's the beginning of the end. Not in some apocalyptic way, but rather in how we think about the prevention and management of HIV.

    20 December 2018 | The Body Pro
  • Biktarvy's success raises doubts about ViiV's 'new era' of HIV treatment

    GlaxoSmithKline subsidiary ViiV Healthcare believes its portfolio of HIV medications will be competitive as treatment for the virus enters an era of two-drug regimens. So far, however, the company's first doublet has performed modestly on the market compared to a key rival's three-drug regimen.

    12 December 2018 | BioPharma Dive
  • Dual HIV Regimen Equaled Triple Even After Treatment Failure

    A "dual" combination of raltegravir (Isentress) plus boosted protease inhibitor was comparable to triple combination regimens with raltegravir for HIV in treatment-experienced patients, including those with previous treatment failure, in a retrospective study with real-world cohort.

    26 November 2018 | MD Magazine
  • Tivicay Plus Boosted Prezista Shows Promise as Two-Drug HIV Regimen

    However, the regimen appears much less potent for those who aren’t virally suppressed.

    16 November 2018 | Poz
  • ViiV Healthcare submits regulatory application to European Medicines Agency for single-tablet, two-drug regimen of dolutegravir and lamivudine for treatment of HIV

    ViiV Healthcare today announced submission of a marketing authorisation application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for a single-tablet, two-drug regimen of dolutegravir (DTG) and lamivudine (3TC) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    16 September 2018 | ViiV press release
  • What you need to know about HIV two-drug regimens

    Integrase inhibitors—potent antiretrovirals that quickly and powerfully suppress HIV—have allowed HIV researchers and clinicians to explore dosing regimens that involve fewer than three or four drugs. Proponents of dual therapy say that effective regimens involving fewer drugs will lower costs, decrease pill burden and reduce the potential for drug-drug interactions and side effects. But is it that simple?

    28 August 2018 | BETA blog
More news
Tell us why you visited aidsmap today
minimise

Could you help us by answering three questions on why you’ve visited aidsmap today?

You can close this questionnaire and come back to it later. Just click on the pink circle.

What prompted you to visit aidsmap today?

What exactly are you looking for? What specific questions do you need answered?

Have you found what you were looking for?

close

Thank you for your feedback

Thank you very much for taking time to fill in this questionnaire. NAM really values your feedback. It helps make the information we provide better.

If you have any other comments on the content of this website, we would be interested to hear from you. Please email info@nam.org.uk.

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.