The biology of HIV transmission: latest news

The biology of HIV transmission resources

  • Transmission facts

    HIV can only be passed on when one person's body fluids get inside another person. HIV can be passed on during sex without a condom,...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Undetectable viral load and HIV transmission

    Effective HIV treatment stops HIV from being passed on during sex.If you have had an undetectable viral load for at least six months and you...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Oral sex

    Many people enjoy giving and receiving oral sex – kissing, licking or sucking another person’s genitals.The risk of getting HIV from performing oral sex on...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV transmission

    The two main ways in which HIV is passed on are unprotected vaginal and anal sex.Condoms, PrEP and HIV treatment are effective ways of preventing...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sex

    Having HIV can affect people’s feelings about sex in many different ways. Some people become anxious about passing HIV on, or feel less desirable. While some people go...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Risk

    An examination of prosecuted behaviours, using scientific evidence to determine actual risk, and how this evidence has been applied in jurisdictions worldwide....

    From: HIV & the criminal law

    Information level Level 4
  • How transmission occurs

    HIV can be transmitted through – and, as far as essentially all evidence shows, only through – several well-established routes: By sharing injecting equipment By...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4

The biology of HIV transmission features

The biology of HIV transmission in your own words

  • Bored and horny

    It’s Sunday afternoon and it’s raining. I’m bored and horny. However, I’ve got £20 left over from the night before and this will be enough...

    From: In your own words

The biology of HIV transmission news from aidsmap

More news

The biology of HIV transmission news selected from other sources

  • Control HIV by treating schistosomiasis, new study suggests

    Of the 34 million people worldwide with HIV, and the 200 million with schistosomiasis, the majority live in Africa -- where millions of people are simultaneously infected with both diseases. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that schistosomiasis infections are associated with increased HIV onward transmission, HIV acquisition in HIV negative women with urogenital schistosomiasis, and progression to death in HIV positive women.

    17 December 2018 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • HIV Risk Greatest During Follicular Phase of Menstrual Cycle

    The follicular phase of the menstrual cycle may be the most vulnerable time for HIV-1 acquisition in women—not the luteal phase, as previously thought—according to the results of a new study published online October 31 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

    16 November 2018 | Contagionlive.com
  • Why Is HIV Not Spread By Mosquitos?

    Have you ever wondered why mosquito-transmitted infections were responsible for shutting down the first attempt to build the Panama Canal (rampant yellow fever) or are able to kill hundreds of thousands of children (malaria) each year in Africa, yet no one has ever been infected with HIV from a mosquito bite?

    03 October 2018 | American Council on Science and Health
  • HIV transmission filmed live by French scientists

    A team of French researchers has succeeded in filming HIV infecting a healthy cell. UNAIDS spoke to Morgane Bomsel, Research Team Director at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), about the feat.

    29 May 2018 | UNAIDS
  • Zambia, South Africa prevention study finds those with herpes virus facing six times HIV risk

    Communities’ HIV prevalence could be predicted “almost exactly” from prevalence of herpes virus, researchers find.

    14 April 2018 | Science Speaks
  • The Blesser's Curse

    How sugar daddies and vaginal microbes created the world’s largest HIV epidemic.

    23 March 2018 | The Atlantic
  • How HIV Alters Cells May Facilitate Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C

    A new study identifies key changes that HIV makes to Langerhans cells in the mucosal lining of the rectum.

    22 March 2018 | Poz
  • Vertical HIV transmission may be influenced by complex synergies with other STI – such as Cytomegalovirus

    The apparently greater susceptibility of sub-Saharan African women to HIV infection has led researchers to consider the various potential synergies between HIV and other genital infections or conditions of the vaginal microbiome. A recent study brings this wider perspective to bear on mother-to-child transmission, casting some fresh light on the complex interrelation between the ‘vertical’ transmission of HIV and active and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) viruria.

    27 July 2017 | BMJ Group blogs
  • HIV/AIDS: Filarial worm infections double the risk of infection

    Since the start of the HIV epidemic, there have been speculations as to why HIV and the immunodeficiency syndrome it causes have spread so much more in Africa than in other countries around the world. Scientists have now, for the first time, confirmed one reason for this: in a cohort study conducted in Tanzania, they discovered that an infection with the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti increases the risk of HIV infection by two to three fold.

    16 August 2016 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • Have sex workers revealed a connection between semen exposure and HIV resistance?

    In a new study, scientists at The Wistar Institute have found that continued semen exposure in these sex workers sustains changes in the cervical and vaginal microenvironment in a way that may actually increase HIV-1 resistance. This information may lead the way to better preventative strategies that block the transmission of the virus and improved designs for future HIV vaccine studies that can monitor the described changes when recruiting sex workers into vaccine trials.

    09 December 2015 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
More news
Tell us why you visited aidsmap today
minimise

Could you help us by answering three questions on why you’ve visited aidsmap today?

You can close this questionnaire and come back to it later. Just click on the pink circle.

What prompted you to visit aidsmap today?

What exactly are you looking for? What specific questions do you need answered?

Have you found what you were looking for?

close

Thank you for your feedback

Thank you very much for taking time to fill in this questionnaire. NAM really values your feedback. It helps make the information we provide better.

If you have any other comments on the content of this website, we would be interested to hear from you. Please email info@nam.org.uk.

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.