Resistance: latest news

Resistance resources

  • Changing HIV treatment

    Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about any side-effects you are experiencing.If you are having problems taking your HIV treatment, it’s important to be honest...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Taking your HIV treatment (adherence)

    Taking your medication exactly as prescribed is key to HIV treatment working.As treatment is a long-term commitment, it’s important that your treatment suits your lifestyle.If you find...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Drug resistance

    It's important to always take your HIV treatment at the right times and in the right amounts. If you don't, HIV may become drug resistant.When...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • An HIV treatment journey

    This illustrated leaflet shows the journey a lot of people go on with HIV treatment. However, each person’s situation is different. Your own circumstances may...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • My drugs chart

    My drugs chart provides information on all the anti-HIV drugs currently licensed for use in Europe.Select your chosen drugs and drag them onto the area...

    From: My drugs chart

  • What is drug resistance?

    One of the possible consequences of not taking your HIV treatment properly is that your HIV will develop resistance to anti-HIV drugs. This section of the booklet provides...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Resistance tests

    Blood tests are available which detect whether the HIV in your body is resistant to any anti-HIV drugs. It's recommended that you have a drug resistance test before...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Taking your HIV treatment

    This booklet is a starting point for anyone who wants to know about treatment for HIV. It provides basic information about how HIV treatment works...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Drug resistance

    HIV reproduces in the body very quickly, making billions of new viruses every day by replicating its genetic material. HIV is a retrovirus; retroviruses have an inherently high...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Resistance in your own words

Resistance news from aidsmap

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Resistance news selected from other sources

  • Infectious diseases doctor sounds an international alarm about HIV treatment resistance in the Philippines

    Dr. Edsel Salvana explains the global implications of treatment-resistant HIV in the Philippines.

    25 January 2018 | Science Speaks
  • AZT: The phoenix of HIV treatment

    During the last 30 years, over 15 million people have received AZT: an antiretroviral used to prevent HIV/AIDS. While it has now been replaced with other drugs in high income countries, it is still used widely in low-to-middle-income countries; this poses issues due to difficulties in detecting resistance to the drug and the side effects it carries. In this blog, author of a paper published in Infectious Disease of Poverty, Eric J. Arts, discusses his career long connection to AZT and the issues with AZT-based treatments in sub-Saharan Africa.

    24 January 2018 | BMC Blogs Network (blog)
  • Immediate HIV Treatment Has Little Impact on Risk of Future Drug Resistance

    Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately rather waiting until a person's CD4 count falls below 500 cells/µL has almost no impact on the person's risk of developing antiretroviral resistance over the next seven years, according to a study published online in the journal AIDS. In this 51,000-person analysis, the impact of immediate ART on acquired drug resistance disappeared almost completely among people starting treatment in 2005 or later.

    07 January 2018 | The Body Pro
  • Transition to dolutegravir cost-effective in LMICs with high HIV drug resistance

    In low- and middle-income countries, resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or NNRTIs, is nearing and exceeding 10% in patients with HIV who are initiating or reinitiating first-line ART, according to recent data. A new modeling study showed that transitioning first-line ART from NNRTIs to dolutegravir may be a cost-effective way to reverse this increasing trend in resistance.

    13 December 2017 | Healio
  • Rising levels of HIV drug resistance

    HIV drug resistance is approaching and exceeding 10 percent in people living with HIV who are about to initiate or reinitiate first-line antiretroviral therapy, according to the largest meta-analysis to date on HIV drug resistance, led by researchers at UCL and the World Health Organization (WHO) and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the WHO.

    01 December 2017 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • BASHH welcomes publication of position statement on doxycycline as post-exposure prophylaxis for sexually transmitted infections

    The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) has welcomed the publication of a new joint BASHH and Public Health England (PHE) position statement on the use of doxycycline as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A conference presentation had suggested that use of PEP with doxycycline was associated with a halving of the rates of bacterial STIs in men who have sex with men (MSM), in an extension of the French IPERGAY trial. However caution is advised.

    03 November 2017 | BASHH
  • Uganda: ARVs Stock-Out Sparks Fear of Mass Drug Resistance

    Civil society organisations and people living with HIV/Aids have warned that almost a million Ugandans could develop resistance to first-line anti-retroviral therapy if nothing is done about the nation-wide stock-out of drugs.

    01 November 2017 | AllAfrica
  • Antibody-Based HIV Tx Proves Durable

    The monoclonal antibody HIV drug ibalizumab, designed for patients who've developed severe drug resistance, had long-lasting protection in the 24-week extension phase of a phase III trial, researchers reported here.

    10 October 2017 | MedPage Today
  • HIV drug resistance found in more than half of young children in Africa

    Approximately 54% of young children with HIV surveyed in Africa had resistance to one or more antiretroviral drugs, according to recent data.

    24 August 2017 | Healio
  • A massive second global wave of AIDS is coming — perhaps within the next 10 years

    Three problems are driving the global fight against HIV into a new danger zone. First, new infections increasingly involve forms of the virus that are already resistant to the primary drugs used to treat and prevent HIV infection. Second, the world is fast approaching the limits of manufacturing capacity for anti-HIV first-line drugs, and the ceiling is far lower for second- and third-line treatments. And third, there aren’t sufficient financial resources applied to the AIDS problem now, and signals from major donors — especially the U.S. government — offer a grim future of diminished resources and greater demands on very poor countries to finance their own HIV fights without outside help.

    31 July 2017 | Business Insider
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.