Information about the use of antiretroviral drugs in pregnancy and other aspects of care for HIV-positive women during pregnancy, so as to prevent vertical transmission and ensure the best outcomes for both mother and infant.

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission: latest news

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission resources

  • Having a baby

    In the UK, thousands of women with HIV have given birth to healthy babies.Taking anti-HIV drugs during the pregnancy will protect your baby from HIV.If...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Women may get bacterial vaginosis when the balance of normal bacteria in their vagina becomes disrupted.It is common and various activities seem to increase the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Viral load

    Effective HIV treatment results in a fall in viral loadAn undetectable viral load is the aim of HIV treatment.People who are taking effective HIV treatment...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Health monitoring during pregnancy

    If a woman has HIV, it is possible for it to be passed on to her baby during pregnancy or delivery, or through breastfeeding. For this reason,...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Contraception, conception and pregnancy

    Becoming a parent of a healthy, HIV-negative child is now a very realistic option for many people with HIV. However, you may want to plan when pregnancy...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and having a baby

    Women living with HIV can give birth without passing on HIV to the baby.Your options for conception will depend on your health and your partner’s...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pregnancy and birth

    British HIV Association (BHIVA) guidelines set out the treatment and care people with HIV in the UK can expect to receive. Its most recent guidelines on HIV...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Life goes on

    In some countries, not everyone who needs HIV treatment can get hold of it. Likewise, in the UK 20 or 30 years ago, effective HIV treatment didn’t...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Consent to HIV tests and treatment

    The right to refuse medical tests and treatment, and how this applies to adults without mental capacity, pregnant women, children and young people....

    From: Social & legal issues for people with HIV

    Information level Level 4
  • HIV & Pregnancy

    Personalised information about having a baby. (Smartphone version available.)...

    From: Resources

  • Mother-to-child transmission

    HIV can pass from an HIV-positive mother to her child:During pregnancy – the foetus is infected by HIV crossing the placenta.During childbirth – the...

    From: HIV transmission & testing

    Information level Level 4

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission features

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission in your own words

Prevention of mother-to-child transmission news from aidsmap

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Prevention of mother-to-child transmission news selected from other sources

  • A Promising Anti-HIV Drug Poses A Dilemma

    The anti-HIV drug dolutegravir is effective — but may carry a risk for pregnant women. While women in wealthy countries are given choices about their medical care, for women in poor countries the situation is different. There aren't enough doctors and nurses to explain the risks and benefits of the new drug to every patient. The country may not have the resources to keep supplies of two different drugs on the shelves. And there is no consistent access to effective birth control.

    23 April 2019 | NPR
  • Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

    Pharmacokinetic data indicate exposure of elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat (Genvoya, Stribild) is lower during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy than postpartum. Low elvitegravir exposure may be associated with an increased risk of treatment failure and an increased risk of HIV-1 transmission to the unborn child, and therefore elvitegravir/cobicistat should not be used during pregnancy.

    17 April 2019 | Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency
  • Avoiding Dolutegravir in Young Women With HIV: Time for a Rethink?

    Total deaths for women with HIV and their children are projected to be lower with dolutegravir-based (Tivicay) antiretroviral therapy (ART) versus efavirenz-based (Sustiva) ART, a model-based analysis found.

    05 April 2019 | MedPage Today
  • 'Vast majority' of elevated viral load episodes in pregnant women caused by non-adherence

    Non-adherence to ART — and not pretreatment drug-resistant mutations — explain the “vast majority” of elevated viral load episodes in women initiating ART during pregnancy, according to results from a study conducted in South Africa.

    02 April 2019 | Healio
  • HIV antibody VRC01LS safe prevention strategy for infants

    Subcutaneous doses of a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, known as VRC01LS, given at birth and 12 weeks were well-tolerated by HIV-exposed infants, according to the results of an open-label safety and pharmacokinetic study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Researchers are studying VRC01LS in combination with ART to prevent HIV infection in neonates.

    12 March 2019 | Healio
  • Tshepiso study: Preventive TB therapy not associated with poor pregnancy outcomes

    Initiating isoniazid preventive therapy for tuberculosis during pregnancy is not associated with a higher rate of poor maternal or infant outcomes, according to observational results from the Tshepiso study presented at CROI.

    12 March 2019 | Healio
  • CROI 2019: Thailand’s strides spanned HIV treatment, prevention and research

    he first HIV vaccine trials to yield signs of hope happened here. Thailand was also the first Asian country to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Now, Thailand has achieved the first part of UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 targets: 98 percent of people infected with HIV know their status.

    06 March 2019 | Science Speaks
  • South Africa urgently needs an antiretroviral pregnancy registry

    With the dolutegravir roll-out around the corner, the time is now ripe for patients and activists to demand a prospective pregnancy registry for the whole of South Africa. Whether it is a new endeavour or piggy-backs on international efforts is a matter for debate, but it is the only way we can answer the question of dolutegravir’s safety with the minimum number of women being exposed to the drug. It’s the least that patients deserve.

    29 January 2019 | Spotlight
  • As A Strategy for HIV Prevention, Disabling the CCR5 Gene in Embryos Implanted in HIV-Negative Mothers Makes Zero Sense

    Here are a bunch of things we know about HIV prevention. You’ll note that nowhere on this list is anything about preventing HIV in babies born to women who don’t have the virus to begin with — because the babies are not at risk, even if the mother’s male sexual partner has HIV.

    03 December 2018 | NEJM Journal Watch
  • Gene editing won’t help the fight against HIV, understanding one’s risk and prevention options will

    Andrew Chidgey says HIV positive men and women can already have HIV negative babies through the use of medication and some well-recognised precautions. This negates the need for gene editing to prevent transmission of HIV and raises ethical questions about a Chinese scientist’s recently announced research.

    01 December 2018 | South China Morning Post
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.