Long-acting HIV treatment: latest news

Long-acting HIV treatment news from aidsmap

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Long-acting HIV treatment news selected from other sources

  • ViiV’s Long-Acting Injectable HIV Regimen Boasts Good 3-Year Results

    The company has released new data from a trial of injectable cabotegravir and Edurant given every four or eight weeks.

    05 November 2018 | Poz
  • Long-lasting HIV injection is a step closer after second GSK study

    A once-monthly injection to control HIV proved as effective as daily pills in a second study by GlaxoSmithKline, paving the way for a new regimen that could be simpler for some patients to be filed with regulators.

    31 October 2018 | Reuters
  • Long-acting injectable implant shows promise for HIV treatment and prevention

    The long-acting antiretroviral drug formulation, developed by UNC School of Medicine researchers, is injected under the skin and forms into a solid implant that dissolves slowly to release anti-HIV medication over time.

    09 October 2018 | University of North Carolina
  • Swapping daily pills for monthly shots could transform HIV treatment and prevention

    New results are raising hopes for easing one challenge of living with HIV: the need to take daily pills for life, both to ward off AIDS and to lower the risk of transmitting the virus to others. Missing doses can also foster the emergence of HIV strains with drug resistance, a danger both to the person receiving treatment and, if those strains spread, to entire populations. Now, a large-scale study has shown over 48 weeks that monthly injections of two long-acting anti-HIV drugs work just as well as taking daily pills.

    23 August 2018 | Science
  • Should Gilead Be Worried About This New Monthly HIV Medication?

    Yesterday, Johnson & Johnson and ViiV Healthcare announced positive results from the Atlas phase 3 study testing their two-drug HIV treatment containing an investigational drug cabotegravir and rilpivirine, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) sold by Johnson & Johnson as Edurant. The important thing here isn't going from three medications to two, but that ViiV and Johnson & Johnson's cabotegravir and rilpivirine combination is injected once a month compared to a daily therapy for the three-drug combination.

    16 August 2018 | Motley Fool
  • Is the World Ready for Long-Acting HIV Treatment?

    "As we look at this question [of] where do long-acting antiretrovirals fit into the armamentarium," commented Carl Dieffenbach, the director of the Division of AIDS within the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, "we have to ask ourselves the question: What problems are long-acting or sustained-release formulations solving, and what problems or concerns are the introduction of these type of formulations actually creating?"

    11 June 2018 | The Body Pro
  • China approves Albuviritide: first domestically developed, long-acting injectable anti-HIV drug

    China has approved the first domestically developed, long-acting injectable HIV drug Albuvirtide, which could be a boon to tens of thousands of HIV/AIDS patients in the country, the official media reported. The drug, approved by the China Food and Drug Administration, can block the fusion of the virus and host cell membranes, interrupting the HIV life cycle in its earliest stage.

    06 June 2018 | Firstpost
  • New long-acting, less-toxic HIV drug suppresses virus in humanized mice

    A team of Yale researchers tested a new chemical compound that suppresses HIV, protects immune cells, and remains effective for weeks with a single dose. In animal experiments, the compound proved to be a promising new candidate to enhance current HIV treatment regimens — without increasing toxic side effects, the researchers said.

    08 January 2018 | Yale News
  • HIV Drugs in the Pipeline: Expected Approvals for 2018

    Three specialty HIV medications—three oral medications and one IV formulation—are expected to receive FDA approval in 2018. All of them are combination products geared toward improving adherence.

    31 December 2017 | Infectious Disease Special Edition
  • Top 10 HIV Clinical Developments of 2017

    By David Alain Wohl, M.D., professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina (UNC).

    19 November 2017 | The Body Pro
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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