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In this issue

Published: 01 January 2009

After five years and more than 50 issues, this issue will be the last edition of HIV Treatment Update edited by yours truly. (You can read more about my take on the changes in the HIV landscape during that time in Back to the future.)

I took over the editorship of NAM’s newsletter in October 2003. That month, Mohammed Dica became the first person in England to be successfully prosecuted for reckless HIV transmission. This led to a great deal of fear and confusion – much of which has not dissipated – ­­ over the possibility of prosecution for passing on HIV to our sexual partners.

Although much has been achieved, notably when Dr Anna Maria Geretti testified in a Kingston courtroom in August 2006 that scientific evidence was unable to definitively prove timing and direction of transmission, prosecutions for the transmission of HIV – and now hepatitis B (see Unsafe convictions?) – continue in the UK. Abroad, the situation is much worse - in many places the bar for prosecutions is set much lower.

Globally, the criminalisation of HIV exposure and transmission, and in some countries, of people with, and at risk of, HIV, threatens much that has been achieved for those of us living with HIV. That’s why I am drawn to human rights issues – notably criminalisation – as the focus of my future work both here in the UK and internationally.

In Adherence and long-term treatment success we examine the latest study on adherence and find out how people living with HIV manage to keep taking treatment regularly.

 When would you start treatment? What are your biggest worries about it? If you’re on it, how has it affected you? These were some of the questions NAM asked in The NAM treatment survey. Gus Cairns analyses the results – and the participants’ illuminating comments.

In Back to the future, Edwin J Bernard provides a personal retrospective of the past five years as editor of this newsletter.

In Unsafe convictions? we examine why HIV advocates have concerns over recent HIV and hepatitis B prosecutions.

Issue 183: January/February 2009

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.