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How HIV causes disease: latest news

How HIV causes disease resources

  • HIV lifecycle

    The immune system is the body’s natural defence system.To survive, HIV needs to infect cells in which new viruses can be made.Different anti-HIV drugs target different...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • CD4 cell counts

    CD4 cell counts give an indication of the health of your immune system.Your CD4 cell count should go up when you take HIV treatment.Monitoring CD4...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and the immune system

    The immune system is the body’s natural defence system. It’s a network of cells, tissues and organs inside the body.The immune system recognises and fights...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • CD4 and viral load

    It’s important for all people with HIV to have regular blood tests. The two most important blood tests are for CD4 and viral load.CD4 and...

    From: The basics

    Information level Level 1
  • Health issues

    If you are ‘HIV positive’ this means that you have a virus called HIV in your body. It doesn’t mean that you are ill, or that...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • The immune system and HIV

    A description of how the immune system works, its response to HIV, and factors affecting disease progression....

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

How HIV causes disease features

How HIV causes disease news from aidsmap

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How HIV causes disease news selected from other sources

  • Scientists find missing clue to how HIV hacks cells to propagate itself

    Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.

    09 November 2017 | University of Chicago News
  • HIV virus fighter linked to cancer mutations

    University of Saskatchewan researchers have found the onset of breast, lung and other cancers may be connected to malfunctions of the immune system as it combats specific viruses such as HIV.

    26 October 2017 | University of Saskatchewan
  • New Study Reveals why people with HIV are more likely to develop Emphysema

    Up to 30 percent of HIV patients who are appropriately treated with antiretroviral therapies develop the chronic lung disease emphysema in their lifetime. Now, new research from Weill Cornell Medicine investigators has uncovered a mechanism that might explain why this lung damage occurs.

    10 May 2017 | Weill Cornell Medicine
  • Pretreatment HIV, immune activation levels determine their persistence during treatment

    A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds that pretreatment levels of HIV and immune activation appear to determine the extent to which viral levels and inflammation persist during antiretroviral treatment.

    25 April 2017 | Eurekalert Inf Dis
  • Body's 'clever' protein could stop HIV in its tracks, scientists find

    The weapon is a protein, found in the reproductive tract of women, which researchers from Hudson Institute of Medical Research and Deakin University have discovered stops HIV from replicating and taking hold.

    28 February 2017 | The Sydney Morning Herald
  • Gut bacteria affect immune recovery in HIV patients, study finds

    Gut bacteria also play their role in the immune recovery of HIV patients, an international study has found. The implications of this finding are that new complementary therapies could be developed that target these bacteria to boost the efficiency of ART and prevent the complications associated with immune deficiency and chronic inflammation.

    06 September 2016 | Science Daily
  • Mutational tug of war over HIV's disease-inducing potential

    A study from Emory AIDS researchers shows how the expected disease severity when someone is newly infected by HIV reflects a balance between the virus' invisibility to the host's immune system and its ability to reproduce.

    24 August 2016 | Eurekalert Medicine & Health
  • HIV entry mechanism into immune cell nucleus revealed

    How does HIV enter the nucleus of immune cells when it is bigger than the pores in its walls? New research shows it hijacks a protein to enlarge the pores.

    22 July 2016 | HIV / AIDS News From Medical News Today
  • New study reveals how HIV enters cell nucleus

    Scientists have solved a mystery that has long baffled HIV researchers: How does HIV manage to enter the nucleus of immune system cells? The discovery could lead to effective new drugs to treat HIV/AIDS.

    23 June 2016 | Science Daily
  • WHO confirms antiretroviral therapy reduces the risk of life-threatening HIV-related infections

    Adults and children with HIV who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) as early as possible reduce their risk of developing serious HIV-related infections, according to new findings published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases on 15 June 2016.

    22 June 2016 | World Health Organization
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.