Co-morbidities, health conditions, diseases, opportunistic infections and other clinical problems that sometimes occur in people living with HIV.

Health problems: latest news

Health problems resources

  • Influenza (flu) and HIV

    People living with HIV are recommended to have the flu vaccine every year.Flu is very contagious and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • A long life with HIV

    This booklet provides information on living well with HIV as you get older. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Other health issues

    As you get older, it’s even more important to regularly attend clinic appointments and stay in touch with your healthcare providers. Your HIV clinic appointments will include...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV and the ageing process

    It’s sometimes said that HIV speeds up the ageing process, but this is not certain.People with HIV are at greater risk of some health conditions, but not...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Managing advanced liver disease

    Over years or decades, chronic hepatitis B or C can cause serious liver disease including advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. As scar tissue or tumours replace normal...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV & hepatitis

    This booklet gives information for people with HIV who also have hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C....

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pneumococcal disease

    Pneumococcal infections are common in people living with HIV, even with higher CD4 cell counts. Vaccination and HIV treatment reduce the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal disease is...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Skin problems

    A rash can be a symptom of recent HIV infection. Other infections can also cause skin problems. They may also be a side-effect or allergic reaction to an anti-HIV drug. Allergic drug...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Fatty liver disease and HIV

    Fatty liver disease occurs when fat builds up in liver cells. A healthy diet and exercise can reduce your risk of fatty liver disease. There are currently no good treatments...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sight problems

    Most people living with HIV don't experience eye problems related to HIV.Sight problems are more likely to occur in people with very low CD4 counts...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pain

    Pain can cause emotional and mental health problems.Medication can be used in both the short and long term to control pain.Treating underlying medical problems may...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cancer and HIV

    Rates of some, but not all, cancers are higher in people living with HIV than other people.For many cancers, treatment works just as well for...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Blood problems and HIV

    People living with HIV who have a low CD4 count sometimes also have low levels of other blood cells.Some of these problems may be caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma and HIV

    Kaposi’s sarcoma remains one of the most common cancers in people living with HIV.HIV treatment protects against Kaposi’s sarcoma and slows down disease progression.People with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea and vomiting are possible side-effects of some HIV drugs.Most often, these side-effects will go away after a few weeks of taking the drug.Medicines called...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common in people with HIV, particularly those with a low CD4 count.It can be caused by infection and is also a possible side-effect of some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Mouth problems

    Mouth (oral) problems are more likely to occur in people with low CD4 counts.They can be caused by either fungal, viral or bacterial infections.You are more likely...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Women may get bacterial vaginosis when the balance of normal bacteria in their vagina becomes disrupted.It is common and various activities seem to increase the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cognitive impairment and HIV

    Problems with thinking and memory can have a wide range of causes.A healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of cognitive impairment in later life.Cognitive impairment caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Chronic kidney disease and HIV

    HIV may contribute to kidney disease but the two most common causes are diabetes and high blood pressure.Lifestyle changes can help keep kidney disease under control.Your HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Type 2 diabetes and HIV

    Changes to your lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.Diabetes requires frequent monitoring and can have serious consequences if left untreated. Rates of diabetes are higher in people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Stroke and HIV

    A stroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment. High blood pressure and raised cholesterol are risk factors for stroke. A healthy diet, regular exercise, stopping smoking, and other...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sexual dysfunction

    ‘Sexual dysfunction’ includes loss of sexual desire, painful sex, and problems with erection or orgasm.Stress, health problems and heavy drinking can contribute to sexual dysfunction.Help is available...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cholesterol

    Excess cholesterol raises the risk of heart disease and stroke.Diet, exercise and smoking all have an impact on cholesterol levels.Some anti-HIV drugs may raise cholesterol levels....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sleep

    Sleep is essential to physical and mental health.Anxiety, depression, drug or alcohol use, and illness can contribute to sleep problems.Simple lifestyle changes may be enough to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • High blood pressure

    You should have your blood pressure monitored regularly as part of your HIV care.HIV drugs can interact with other medicines to affect blood pressure.Blood pressure...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lipodystrophy

    This section begins with an overview of metabolic and body-fat changes, including sections on Metabolism - the basics, HIV, HAART and metabolic changes and Treating...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • A to Z of symptoms

    Information on the symptoms commonly experienced by HIV-positive people, as a result of HIV infection or drug treatments, including their causes and what to do...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Health problems features

Health problems in your own words

Health problems news from aidsmap

More news

Health problems news selected from other sources

  • Chronic Pain Is a Huge, Underrecognized Problem for People With HIV

    Living with chronic pain not only drags down quality of life, but it is also linked to poorer HIV-related health outcomes.

    12 October 2018 | Poz
  • Psychosocial Factors Associated With Persistent Pain in HIV

    A meta-analysis and literature review, published in Pain, found moderate evidence supporting an association between pain outcomes in people with HIV and several psychosocial factors, such as depression, psychologic distress, post-traumatic stress, drug abuse, sleep disturbance, reduced antiretroviral therapy adherence, healthcare use, missed HIV clinic visits, unemployment, and protective psychologic factors.

    26 September 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Physical Activity Associated With Cognitive Benefits in Women Living With HIV

    Physical activity may protect against cognitive impairment in women living with HIV, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Infectious Disease.

    20 September 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • Preventing Muscle Loss Among the Elderly

    Sarcopenia, a decline in skeletal muscle in older people, contributes to loss of independence.

    03 September 2018 | New York Times
  • Risk of thyroid dysfunction not associated with HIV status

    The prevalence of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism is similar in uninfected patients and those with well-treated HIV, suggesting that there is no association between thyroid dysfunction, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations, and HIV status, according to a study published in AIDS.

    30 August 2018 | Clinical Advisor
  • Improving the Care of Aging Adults Living With HIV

    "Ageism perpetuates the invisibility of older adults, which renders current medical and social service systems unprepared to respond to the needs of people aging with HIV infection," said Mark Brennan-Ing, PhD, director for research and evaluation at ACRIA, a nonprofit and community-based AIDS service organization based in New York City.

    13 August 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • HIV Patients on Opioid Therapy Often Aren't Monitored for Addiction

    Opioids have become a common treatment for people living with HIV who also deal with chronic pain. However, new research suggests those patients aren’t receiving robust monitoring to prevent opioid misuse, despite evidence that most are open to it.

    02 July 2018 | MD Magazine
  • What is on the minds of PLHIV in Europe in terms of their long term health?

    If they were to switch to different HIV medications, long term health and a low risk of long term side effects are by far the two most important aspects in the eyes of respondents living with HIV in Europe.

    25 June 2018 | EATG
  • Menopause worsens fatigue, muscle aches in women with HIV

    Researchers at Columbia University found evidence that fatigue and muscle aches — two of the most common symptoms among patients with HIV — are exacerbated by menopause. Their study underscores the need for health care providers to consider menopause when treating the often-overlooked aging HIV population, according to Rebecca Schnall, PhD, RN, Mary Dickey Lindsay Associate Professor of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at Columbia University School of Nursing, and colleagues.

    26 March 2018 | Healio
  • Study Suggests That Understanding Chronic Pain Can Help Patients Manage It Better

    Often, we think that medication or surgery is the only answer for chronic pain, but a new study out of the University of Alabama (not restricted to HIV-positive people) shows how some basic pain education or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) techniques may help patients get a grip on pain, if not alleviate it entirely.

    22 March 2018 | The Body Pro
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.