Health problems: latest news

Health problems resources

  • Cancer and HIV

    Rates of some, but not all, cancers are higher in people living with HIV than other people.For many cancers, treatment works just as well for...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Blood problems and HIV

    People living with HIV who have a low CD4 count sometimes also have low levels of other blood cells.Some of these problems may be caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma and HIV

    Kaposi’s sarcoma remains one of the most common cancers in people living with HIV.HIV treatment protects against Kaposi’s sarcoma and slows down disease progression.People with...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Nausea and vomiting

    Nausea and vomiting are possible side-effects of some HIV drugs.Most often, these side-effects will go away after a few weeks of taking the drug.Medicines called...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Diarrhoea

    Diarrhoea is common in people with HIV, particularly those with a low CD4 count.It can be caused by infection and is also a possible side-effect of some...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Mouth problems

    Mouth (oral) problems are more likely to occur in people with low CD4 counts.They can be caused by either fungal, viral or bacterial infections.You are more likely...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bacterial vaginosis

    Women may get bacterial vaginosis when the balance of normal bacteria in their vagina becomes disrupted.It is common and various activities seem to increase the...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cognitive impairment and HIV

    Problems with thinking and memory can have a wide range of causes.A healthy lifestyle lowers the risk of cognitive impairment in later life.Cognitive impairment caused...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Bone problems and HIV

    When your bones are thinner, a trip or fall can result in a broken bone. Exercise and other lifestyle changes are good for your bones. People aged 50+ and...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Menopause and HIV

    The menopause is a natural part of each woman’s ageing process. Knowing what symptoms to expect during the menopause can help you deal with the experience. Hormone replacement therapy...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Chronic kidney disease and HIV

    HIV may contribute to kidney disease but the two most common causes are diabetes and high blood pressure.Lifestyle changes can help keep kidney disease under control.Your HIV...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Type 2 diabetes and HIV

    Changes to your lifestyle can reduce your risk of diabetes.Diabetes requires frequent monitoring and can have serious consequences if left untreated. Rates of diabetes are higher in people...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Stroke and HIV

    A stroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment. High blood pressure and raised cholesterol are risk factors for stroke. A healthy diet, regular exercise, stopping smoking, and other...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Tiredness and fatigue

    Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their energy levels after starting HIV treatment.A healthy balanced diet may help...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sexual dysfunction

    ‘Sexual dysfunction’ includes loss of sexual desire, painful sex, and problems with erection or orgasm.Stress, health problems and heavy drinking can contribute to sexual dysfunction.Help is available...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Cholesterol

    Excess cholesterol raises the risk of heart disease and stroke.Diet, exercise and smoking all have an impact on cholesterol levels.Some anti-HIV drugs may raise cholesterol levels....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Sleep

    Sleep is essential to physical and mental health.Anxiety, depression, drug or alcohol use, and illness can contribute to sleep problems.Simple lifestyle changes may be enough to...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Managing advanced liver disease

    Over years or decades, chronic hepatitis B or C can cause serious liver disease including advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis or liver cancer (hepatocellular cancer). As scar tissue or tumours...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV & hepatitis

    This booklet gives information for people with HIV who also have hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C....

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Pneumococcal disease

    Pneumococcal infections are common in people with HIV.Vaccination and HIV treatment reduce the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease.Pneumococcal disease is treated with antibiotics....

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Influenza ('flu')

    It is recommended that people with HIV are vaccinated against the flu.Flu is very contagious and spreads the same way as colds do.You can get...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • High blood pressure

    You should have your blood pressure monitored regularly as part of your HIV care.HIV drugs can interact with other medicines to affect blood pressure.Blood pressure...

    From: Factsheets

    Information level Level 2
  • Lipodystrophy

    This section begins with an overview of metabolic and body-fat changes, including sections on Metabolism - the basics, HIV, HAART and metabolic changes and Treating...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4
  • A to Z of symptoms

    Information on the symptoms commonly experienced by HIV-positive people, as a result of HIV infection or drug treatments, including their causes and what to do...

    From: HIV treatments directory

    Information level Level 4

Health problems features

Health problems in your own words

Health problems news from aidsmap

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Health problems news selected from other sources

  • Chemsex Has Always Been With Us

    Not before time, the gay press in London, realising we have a dangerous drugs-and-sex scene here that is killing gay men, has finally started to cover it in an analytic, compassionate and sober way (pun intended). I’m pleased about this, and pleased by this powerfully written piece by David Stuart (see https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/chemsex-will-defines-period-gay-history/#gs.3r47mag). No one has done more to help and rescue gay Londoners who have got lost in the maze of chemsex, and help them achieve self-respect and structure in their lives. And yet I disagree that Chemsex is anything new. We gay men have been always been furtive about the sex we sex we want and do, and have always sought private, intoxicated spaces to do it in.

    19 September 2017 | Huffington Post
  • Chronic pain common in people living with HIV

    HIVMA comprehensive guidelines recommend screening everyone with HIV, offering multidisciplinary treatment focusing on non-drug options.

    14 September 2017 | EurekAlert
  • Gay Black Men Confront Crystal Meth

    After experiencing the death of a friend who became addicted to crystal meth, Micheal Rice, a US film maker started asking gay black meth users -- many of whom inject the drug in addition to smoking it from a glass pipe -- whether they'd be willing to talk about their experiences on camera. That led to parTy boi, a raw and heartbreaking documentary Rice has made in which New York City gay black men talk (sometimes incoherently) about both using and dealing meth, sometimes while doing those things.

    06 July 2017 | The Body
  • People with HIV more likely to develop diabetes, study finds

    A new study suggests the diabetes prevalence is much higher among HIV-positive individuals than the general population, even when obesity is not present.

    31 January 2017 | HIV / AIDS News From Medical News Today
  • Stigma and empty wallets make HIV positive people carry on despite pain

    Up to three quarters of people living with HIV suffer from pain. The Conversation Africa spoke to Antonia Wadley about research that measured activity and resilience among people living with HIV and pain.

    03 October 2016 | The Conversation
  • HIV Patients at Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    Patients living with HIV/AIDS have an increased risk of developing several autoimmune diseases, a nationwide Taiwanese study suggested.

    15 September 2016 | MedPage Today
  • Not So Fast: Do people with HIV really experience accelerated aging?

    Recent talk about HIV and aging has almost always been scary. A number of studies conclude that people living with HIV have so-called “accelerated aging”—meaning they will suffer heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and osteoporosis more often and sooner than those without HIV. Well, this is one article on aging and HIV that will challenge the concept of people living with HIV having an early expiration date. Instead, we can look at what we know and what we don’t, to get a better idea of what the risks are for HIV-positive people growing older—and what they can do about them.

    08 July 2016 | Positively Aware
  • South Africa: Depression risks and HIV – A major problem largely ignored

    Depression is a major issue in South Africa among people living with HIV, but has received little attention. New studies have highlighted strong links between HIV-AIDS and mental illness including depression, heightened risks of violence faced by children affected by the virus, and some ways to tackle the problem.

    09 June 2016 | Medical Brief
  • HIV-infected organs transplanted at Birmingham hospital

    A Birmingham hospital has successfully transplanted two HIV infected organs into patients also suffering from the disease. Liver transplants, from two separate donors, were carried out at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, in Edgbaston, in the pioneering procedures. Whilst one patient donated both kidneys in surgery performed at Guy’s Hospital, in London.

    19 May 2016 | Birmingham Mail
  • Cryptococcal meningitis: a blind spot in curbing AIDS

    Cryptococcal meningitis, a co-infection of HIV, is a leading killer of patients with AIDS worldwide. Yet it receives little global attention.

    15 April 2016 | The Lancet (requires free registration)
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Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.