Treatment is recommended for all people living with HIV. It involves taking a combination of antiretroviral drugs. This stops the virus from replicating and allows the immune system to strengthen and fight infections.

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  • ViiV Healthcare submits regulatory application to European Medicines Agency for single-tablet, two-drug regimen of dolutegravir and lamivudine for treatment of HIV

    ViiV Healthcare today announced submission of a marketing authorisation application (MAA) to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for a single-tablet, two-drug regimen of dolutegravir (DTG) and lamivudine (3TC) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    16 September 2018 | ViiV press release
  • Focus on HIV-2 Infection: A Clinician Roundtable

    Infectious Disease Advisor interviewed the following experts to discuss the challenges and clinical implications pertaining to HIV-2.

    04 September 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • What you need to know about HIV two-drug regimens

    Integrase inhibitors—potent antiretrovirals that quickly and powerfully suppress HIV—have allowed HIV researchers and clinicians to explore dosing regimens that involve fewer than three or four drugs. Proponents of dual therapy say that effective regimens involving fewer drugs will lower costs, decrease pill burden and reduce the potential for drug-drug interactions and side effects. But is it that simple?

    28 August 2018 | BETA blog
  • Should Gilead Be Worried About This New Monthly HIV Medication?

    Yesterday, Johnson & Johnson and ViiV Healthcare announced positive results from the Atlas phase 3 study testing their two-drug HIV treatment containing an investigational drug cabotegravir and rilpivirine, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) sold by Johnson & Johnson as Edurant. The important thing here isn't going from three medications to two, but that ViiV and Johnson & Johnson's cabotegravir and rilpivirine combination is injected once a month compared to a daily therapy for the three-drug combination.

    16 August 2018 | Motley Fool
  • Benefits, Risks of Dolutegravir Center Stage at AIDS 2018

    The integrase strand transfer inhibitor dolutegravir (Tivicay, GlaxoSmithKline) will be in the spotlight at the upcoming International AIDS Conference 2018.

    18 July 2018 | Medscape (requires free registration)
  • Dolutegravir preconception signal: time is up for shoddy surveillance

    The news in May 2018 of a potential risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking dolutegravir (DTG) at the time of conception sent shockwaves through the HIV community. But, despite massive global investment, aggressive transition plans – as well as calls for years for more systematic recording of outcomes when women receive ART in pregnancy– few prospective birth registrieshave been established in other settings that can refute or confirm this finding. Meanwhile, women of child-bearing age, whether they intend to become pregnant or not, are being told that they must stick with (or go back to) efavirenz (EFV) – a drug that, before this news, was in the process of being replaced with DTG.

    16 July 2018 | HIV i-Base
  • We Must Talk About Having Diarrhea. I’ll Go First.

    My discomfort discussing anything butt-related is well documented, but this is important. Here’s why. One in five people living with HIV suffers from chronic diarrhea. That’s too many, and I happen to be one of them. Many of us figure that if the meds are working and we’re healthy, then gastrointestinal problems simply come with the territory. Remember the HIV drug Kaletra? What a nightmare.

    16 July 2018 | My Fabulous Disease
  • Reduced-Dose Darunavir Effective in Virologically Suppressed HIV-1

    In well-suppressed, treatment-experienced adults with HIV, decreasing the dose of ritonavir-boosted darunavir (darunavir/r) from the standard dose is associated with a high rate of virologic suppression and was found to be safe over a 48-week period, according to research published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    04 July 2018 | Infectious Disease Advisor
  • No association found between efavirenz, suicide risk

    Contrary to previous findings, individuals with HIV treated with efavirenz demonstrated no increased risk for suicidal ideation or depression, according to new research published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    26 June 2018 | Healio
  • What is on the minds of PLHIV in Europe in terms of their long term health?

    If they were to switch to different HIV medications, long term health and a low risk of long term side effects are by far the two most important aspects in the eyes of respondents living with HIV in Europe.

    25 June 2018 | EATG
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.