Experiences of stigma: latest news

Experiences of stigma resources

  • What is stigma?

    Stigma means different things to different people. One dictionary’s definition is: “The shame or disgrace attached to something regarded as socially unacceptable.” There may be a feeling of ‘us...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • Other people’s stories

    There are also some websites in which people with HIV have written first-hand accounts of their experiences and feelings. On other websites, you can watch videos of people...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • HIV, stigma & discrimination

    This booklet is for people living with HIV and is about stigma and discrimination. ...

    From: Booklets

    Information level Level 2
  • The negative impact on public health

    In recent years a number of organisations have published papers, monographs and policy documents highlighting ways in which using the criminal law to address potential or actual...

    From: HIV & the criminal law

    Information level Level 4

Experiences of stigma features

Experiences of stigma in your own words

Experiences of stigma news from aidsmap

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Experiences of stigma news selected from other sources

  • Did the AIDS Panic Make Trump Afraid of Haitians?

    In the 1980s, the Centers for Disease Control and a rabid New York media falsely portrayed Haitians as diseased and dangerous.

    16 January 2018 | Politico
  • How Many People in Haiti Have AIDS? Trump's Alleged Insult Immigrant Insult Doesn't Reflect Facts

    The Trump administration spent the holiday weekend fending off the uproar over President Donald Trump’s reported insults about largely black immigrants, especially his alleged insistence that thousands of Haitians bound for the United States “all have AIDS.” But the remark wasn't just offensive — it’s certainly also incredibly wrong.

    26 December 2017 | Newsweek
  • When HIV is criminalized: Rosemary Namubiru, nurse living with HIV

    Rosemary Namubiru is a 67-year-old nurse living with HIV. She is a mother, grandmother and IAS Member. She was wrongfully accused of intentionally exposing a child to HIV while administering an injection in January 2014. The child did not acquire HIV. However, the accusations created a media firestorm, and she was arrested live on television. Originally charged with attempted murder, she was eventually convicted of criminal negligence. However, on appeal, the judge found that her initial three-year sentence was excessive and ordered her release after she served 10 months in prison. This is her story …

    08 December 2017 | International AIDS Society
  • People Living with HIV Can Safely Choose Parenthood

    A family medicine physician argues for reproductive justice for people living with HIV. "I have seen women who travel hundreds of miles for their pregnancy care because no provider in their community is comfortable pregnant women with HIV. I have seen patients go out of their way for their medical care because they fear disclosure in their community if they see a provider for their HIV care closer to home."

    01 December 2017 | Poz
  • Avon and Somerset police branded ‘disgusting’ for HIV ‘misinformation’ over spit hoods

    People living with HIV say Avon and Somerset police are “disgusting” for suggesting the immunodeficiency virus can be contracted through spitting. One HIV positive man, who has asked not to be named, claims the language used around the police’s announcement that its officers would be allowed to put ‘spit hoods’ over the heads of people who have been arrested only furthered “misconceptions and lies” about HIV.

    21 November 2017 | Bristol Post
  • Police accused of exaggerating risks of HIV to introduce spit guards

    A police force has been accused of fear mongering and stigmatising sufferers of hepatitis C and HIV by playing up the risks of transmission of blood-borne viruses as a reason to introduce spit guards.

    20 November 2017 | The Guardian
  • A preoccupation with “patient zero” stimulated, but may also have stymied, early efforts to understand AIDS

    In his book Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic, Richard McKay retraces the fits and starts of early AIDS research and how the evocative concept of a “patient zero” both captured the imagination of the general public and fed into the media hype that fueled speculation about the disease.

    20 November 2017 | Science
  • Stigma surrounding tuberculosis keeps patients from services, worsens health risks, but remains largely unmeasured, unaddressed

    A special issue of the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease shows, stigmatizing stereotypes, fears and realities associated with TB add to the misery of a disease requiring lengthy and debilitating treatment, lead health workers to make inappropriate and unnecessary referrals, interfere with contact tracing, deprive patients of community support, and discourage people at risk for disease — including health workers — from accessing services they need.

    20 November 2017 | Science Speaks
  • Living with HIV and AIDS, and unwelcome in Zimbabwe's churches

    Shunned by family, scorned in state media and deemed “worse than dogs and pigs” by President Robert Mugabe, gays in Zimbabwe often find their country’s churches just as hostile.

    16 November 2017 | Religion News Service
  • ViiV Survey Reveals Nuances of Living With HIV

    Respondents reported on their feelings about antiretrovirals, their relationships with their clinicians and dealing with stigma.

    30 October 2017 | Poz
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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