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Detectable HIV Despite Treatment? Clonal Expansion Could Be The Culprit

In a study of people with a low but detectable viral load despite adherence to treatment, infected cells were apparently cloning themselves.

Published
14 March 2019
From
Poz
HIV-Related Immune Activation May Predict Weight Gain and Exacerbate Complications, Especially in Women

HIV can cause persistent immune activation that contributes to an increased risk of complications such as heart disease and certain cancers. New NIAID-supported research presented today [March 6] at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle sheds light on the relationship between immune activation and weight gain.

Published
11 March 2019
From
HIV.gov
Has a second person with HIV been cured?

“This is a big deal,” says Sharon Lewin, who heads the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity in Melbourne, Australia. “It tells us that Timothy Brown wasn’t a one-off.” Although the interventions that the two patients received could only be used on a tiny fraction of the 37 million HIV-infected people worldwide, their stories point to cure strategies that could be more widely applicable.

Published
06 March 2019
From
Science Magazine
Using anti-cancer immunotherapy to fight HIV

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have shown that immunotherapy treatments against cancer could reduce the amount of virus that persists in people on triple therapy. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, they show, in the cells of people living with HIV, how these therapies reveal the virus - until now hidden in the hollows of infected cells - to the immune system.

Published
20 February 2019
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Insufficient food linked to inflammation in HIV-positive women

Past research with HIV-negative people suggests that food insecurity is associated with heightened levels of inflammation. Now, in a recent study, scientists at 10 major clinics across the U.S. have found that food insecurity was linked to an increased risk of elevated inflammation among HIV-positive women. The link between food insecurity and inflammation was present even in women whose viral loads were suppressed due to good adherence to ART.

Published
29 January 2019
From
CATIE
HIV Establishes Reservoir Within Three Days in Monkeys

Beginning six months of treatment within two days following infection prevented viral rebound in at least some animals in a recent study.

Published
01 January 2019
From
Poz
Study Determines Why Patients With HIV Have Higher Rates of Cancer

After investigating why patients with HIV have higher rates of cancer than the general population, researchers identified how T-cells move and multiply to invade other cells in these patients.

Published
17 December 2018
From
American Journal of Managed Care
Needles in a haystack: the quest for bnAbs

HIV induces antibody responses in infected individuals, but only a few of these individuals manage to produce antibodies that are capable of viral neutralization—and even fewer produce antibodies that can neutralize different strains of HIV.

Published
01 December 2018
From
Nature
Virus detectives test whole-body scans in search of HIV’s hiding places

To prevent the virus from rebounding after drug therapy, researchers must first map where it lurks in the body.

Published
23 October 2018
From
Nature
PET Scans May Predict Who Gets Inflammatory Reaction to HIV Treatment Start

The imaging method known as a PET scan may be able to predict who among those starting antiretroviral (ARV) treatment with an immune system highly damaged by HIV will develop HIV-associated immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS).

Published
26 September 2018
From
Poz
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.