UNAIDS’ targets are for 90% of people with HIV to be diagnosed, 90% of diagnosed people to be taking treatment, and 90% of people on treatment to have an undetectable viral load. Achieving these targets will greatly reduce the spread of HIV.

Achieving the 90-90-90 target: latest news

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Achieving the 90-90-90 target news from aidsmap

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Achieving the 90-90-90 target news selected from other sources

  • AIDSfree: London looks to stop the stigma and halt new HIV cases by 2030

    The HIV epidemic in London could be halted in the next 12 years if everybody who has the virus is diagnosed and takes treatment, a leading doctor said on Monday, as The Independent and Evening Standard launched our Christmas appeal.

    05 December 2018 | The Independent
  • Meet the 'radical gay doctor' behind NYC's falling HIV rate

    Once the epicenter of the AIDS crisis, New York City now leads the country in ending the epidemic — thanks, in part, to Dr. Demetre Daskalakis.

    02 December 2018 | NBCNews.com
  • Lloyd Russell-Moyle: Why I decided to go public about being HIV positive

    Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle revealed he was HIV positive in a speech to the House of Commons. This is what he said.

    01 December 2018 | New Statesman
  • Is the end in sight for HIV? by Matthew Hodson, Executive Director of NAM/aidsmap

    Matthew Hodson, Executive Director of NAM/aidsmap, explains the many advances in HIV prevention and asks whether the end of HIV is in sight?

    30 November 2018 | boyz
  • Drop in new diagnoses shows the importance of HIV testing in ending HIV

    Matthew Hodson says the UK can celebrate its latest HIV statistics but country must keep up its momentum - and you can play your part.

    30 November 2018 | Gay Star News
  • UK smashes targets for reducing transmission of HIV

    As our community comes together to mark World AIDS Day, there’s some good news from the UK on HIV prevention. Public Health England have released their annual update on the UK’s progress towards ending the HIV epidemic. This report reflects the analysis of the data that has been collected to the end of 2017, and it demonstrates that the combination prevention strategies being implemented across the UK are really working.

    30 November 2018 | Means Happy
  • Housing needed to reduce HIV infections

    Continued success in engaging people in HIV care and prevention will require more affordable housing. When housing is unstable, taking medicines and attending appointments take a backseat to immediate survival. Often, homeless individuals turn to sex work or substance use, which can increase the risk of HIV transmission and worsen mental health. Older adults living with HIV, who make up 65 percent of HIV-positive San Franciscans, are experiencing increasing housing instability due to declining incomes and skyrocketing rental costs.

    30 November 2018 | San Francisco Chronicle
  • San Francisco to focus HIV services on homeless population

    When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this month awarded San Francisco an $8 million-four year grant to help eliminate HIV, the mayor’s office announced it would dedicate the extra funds to the city’s most vulnerable populations – focusing on those without homes.

    29 November 2018 | Mission Local
  • UK meets UN target in drive to end HIV epidemic

    More than 90% of cases are diagnosed, on treatment and virally suppressed, Public Health England says.

    29 November 2018 | The Guardian
  • New UNAIDS report shows that 75% of all people living with HIV know their HIV status

    A new report from UNAIDS shows that intensified HIV testing and treatment efforts are reaching more people living with HIV. In 2017, three quarters of people living with HIV (75%) knew their HIV status, compared to just two thirds (67%) in 2015, and 21.7 million people living with HIV (59%) had access to antiretroviral therapy, up from 17.2 million in 2015.

    22 November 2018 | UNAIDS
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.