ddI (didanosine, Videx/VidexEC)

ddI (didanosine, Videx/VidexEC) is an anti-HIV drug that reduces the amount of virus in the body. Anti-HIV drugs such as ddI slow down or prevent damage to the immune system and reduce the risk of developing AIDS-related illnesses .

Didanosine belongs to a class of drugs known as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). When HIV infects a cell, the enzyme reverse transcriptase copies the viral single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded viral DNA. This viral DNA is then integrated into the CD4 chromosomal DNA and can go on to reproduce in the body. Four natural nucleosides complete the DNA synthesis: adenosine, cytidine, quanosine, and thymidine. An NRTI drug substitutes a defective version of one of the nucleosides, causing premature termination of the proviral DNA chain.

ddI is also known by the chemical name 2’,3’-dideoxyinosine, by the generic name didanosine and by its trade names Videx and VidexEC. It is manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap