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Viral load news

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Drug resistance accumulates fast in people with low but detectable viral loads, Kenyan study finds

A study measuring HIV drug resistance at two timepoints in Kenyan patients on second-line, protease inhibitor-based regimens has found very high levels of drug resistance in people with

Published
15 hours ago
By
Gus Cairns
Study confirms STIs make no difference to undetectability and infectiousness in people taking HIV treatment

A study conducted with gay men in Thailand has found that people who are diagnosed with HIV and start antiretroviral therapy (ART) are no less likely

Published
28 September 2018
By
Gus Cairns
What does ‘undetectable’ really mean?

Things you need to know about the HIV breakthrough.

Published
26 August 2018
From
Daily Xtra
One in nine people may be able to control their viral load after stopping treatment, US study finds

A US collaboration that pooled data from 14 scientific studies containing between them more than 600 HIV-positive people has found that 67 of them were able to

Published
16 August 2018
By
Gus Cairns
Zero transmissions mean zero risk – PARTNER 2 study results announced

The chance of any HIV-positive person with an undetectable viral load transmitting the virus to a sexual partner is scientifically equivalent to zero, researchers confirmed

Published
24 July 2018
By
Gus Cairns
HIV Undetectable = Untransmittable: Interview With Bruce Richman

Transcript of YouTube video interview with Bruce richman of U=U: published on YouTube in May 2017.

Published
03 July 2018
From
The Body
Age difference in HIV infection matters – but it’s not always the younger person who is at risk

A European study of men who have sex with men (MSM) presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2018) shows that age

Published
19 March 2018
By
Gus Cairns
Darunavir/ritonavir most durable boosted protease inhibitor in European patients, especially those switching treatment for any reason

Darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) is the most durable boosted protease inhibitor for antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced people, investigators from the EuroSIDA cohort report in HIV Medicine. People switching

Published
13 February 2018
By
Michael Carter
Faster action on adherence is needed after viral load becomes detectable, researchers warn global treatment programmes

Low-level HIV viral load, above the limit of detection, is an important warning signal for future treatment failure and World Health Organization guidelines on spotting treatment failure

Published
12 January 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Baseline CD4 count biggest factor in long-term immune system improvements after starting HIV therapy

Pre-treatment CD4 cell count is the most important factor in immune recovery following the initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), according to the results of a large observational

Published
14 December 2017
By
Michael Carter
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.