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Immune Response BioPharma, Inc Announces the FDA has Accepted REMUNE HIV/AIDS Vaccine BLA for Review

Immune Response BioPharma, Inc., Today provides an update on REMUNE and announces the FDA has accepted the REMUNE HIV/AIDS vaccine BLA (biologics licensing application) for review for therapeutic treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS.

Published
20 hours ago
From
Immune Response BioPharma press release
We may need to combine many approaches to achieve a cure, delegates hear

It is unlikely that one single approach will achieve a cure for HIV infection, delegates at a community cure workshop held the day before the Conference on

Published
09 March 2015
By
Gus Cairns
University of RochesterTests HIV Vaccine Pill

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are testing a new oral vaccine to prevent infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The vaccine is unique because it is given as a pill, unlike most HIV vaccines tested to date that have been given as shots.

Published
20 February 2015
From
University of Rochester press release
NIH-sponsored HIV vaccine trial launches in South Africa

A clinical trial has launched in South Africa to study an investigational HIV vaccine regimen for safety and the immune responses it generates in volunteers. This experimental regimen is based on the one tested in the RV144 trial - -the first to demonstrate that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection -- but is designed to potentially provide greater protection and is adapted to the predominant HIV subtype in southern Africa.

Published
19 February 2015
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Experimental AIDS Drug Stirs Talk Of Vaccine 'Alternative'

For more than three decades, scientists have tried unsuccessfully to develop an effective vaccine for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But now researchers say they have created an experimental drug that may function as a sort of "alternative" vaccine for the virus. The experimental drug, a protein known as eCD4-IG, blocks infection by keeping the virus from binding to the immune cells that are the virus's target. In tests on monkeys, the drug "candidate" proved to be extremely effective at blocking infection--even with the most virulent strains of HIV and its simian counterpart, SIV.

Published
19 February 2015
From
Huffington Post
The Search for a Permanent Alternative to HIV Drugs

Researchers Carefully Tailor a Study to Find Patients to Test Going Off Antiretroviral Medication

Published
16 February 2015
From
Wall Street Journal
Déjà Vu – Claims of HIV Cures and Re-Treading Old Ground

A few days ago while in Abuja, I was surprised to hear the news presenter announce that a Federal High Court had “lifted the ban” on Dr Abalaka’s “vaccine” against HIV. I was struck by a number of things – an abiding discomfort at the quality of reporting on science and health matters in the Nigerian media; a sense of guilt that, in failing to tell our stories, younger Nigerians are at risk of repeating missteps of the past; and a fear that many, misled by the news item, may put their lives at risk.

Published
28 January 2015
From
Nigeria Health Watch
Bill Gates Predicts Two Miracles for AIDS Relief by 2030

Bill Gates said he expects a pair of advances by 2030 that will eliminate most of the damage from AIDS. Improved treatment and the development of a vaccine to prevent new infections are the “two miracles” needed to help turn the tide, the billionaire said Friday at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Published
26 January 2015
From
Bloomberg
Human mode of responding to HIV vaccine is conserved from monkeys

In a study published in the journal Immunity, the researchers report that an investigational vaccine that elicited an immune response in an estimated 31 percent of participants was able to do so because of a particular antibody gene motif that is shared with rhesus macaques and other primates. "It turns out that this antibody response that can recognize this part of the HIV envelope is encoded in the genes present throughout primate development," said lead author Kevin Wiehe, Ph.D. "We found it in almost every primate species we studied." The drawback, however, is that this ancient response might compete with the response aimed at by experimental HIV vaccines - novel, broadly neutralising antibodies that can defuse the virus regardless of how it mutates.

Published
19 January 2015
From
Medical Express
Elite controllers may pay a high price for their low viral load

About one in 200 people with HIV maintains an undetectable viral load and high CD4 counts without having to take antiretroviral therapy (ART). These so-called ‘elite controllers’

Published
07 January 2015
By
Gus Cairns
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