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Dolutegravir may cause birth defects, European Medicines Agency warns

Regulatory agencies in the United States and European Union have warned that women with HIV who can become pregnant should not use the integrase inhibitor

Published
21 May 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Potential safety issue affecting women living with HIV using dolutegravir at the time of conception

WHO advises that countries and ministries follow the existing 2016 WHO Consolidated ARV Guidelines, and consider the following: Pregnant women who are taking DTG should not stop their ARV therapy and should speak with their health provider for additional guidance. If other first‐line ARVs cannot be used in women of childbearing age, DTG may be considered in cases where consistent contraception can be assured.

Published
21 May 2018
From
World Health Organization
High prevalence of menopausal symptoms in women living with HIV, but very few receive treatments for them

Nine in ten women living with HIV aged 45 to 60 have hot flushes and other somatic symptoms of the menopause, but often have difficulties getting advice

Published
17 May 2018
By
Roger Pebody
Women and HIV: invisible no longer

Women and HIV: Invisible No Longer was a one-year project led by Sophia Forum and Terrence Higgins Trust. It aimed to set out clear recommendations for policy and service development to ensure that greater focus is given to women affected by HIV.

Published
09 April 2018
From
Terrence Higgins Trust
Efavirenz may undermine effectiveness of the vaginal ring contraceptive

The antiretroviral drug efavirenz significantly reduces the levels of both hormones in the vaginal ring contraceptive in women with HIV, Kimberly Scarsi of University of Nebraska Medical

Published
08 March 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Women with HIV less likely to receive recommended treatments for gynaecologic cancers

The majority of HIV-positive women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer do not receive treatment recommended by cancer guidelines, according to research conducted in the United States

Published
25 January 2018
By
Michael Carter
NIH Begins Large HIV Treatment Study in Pregnant Women

The National Institutes of Health has launched a large international study to compare the safety and efficacy of three antiretroviral treatment regimens for pregnant women living with HIV and the safety of these regimens for their infants. The study will evaluate the current preferred first-line regimen for pregnant women recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and two regimens containing newer antiretroviral drugs that are becoming more widely used.

Published
24 January 2018
From
NIAID press release
The Best Antiretroviral Therapy for Pregnant Women? The Controversy Continues

There's considerable controversy in an area of HIV medicine that one would think should be all but solved by now. It's what HIV treatment we should give pregnant women.

Published
18 October 2017
From
The Body PRO
New guidelines recommend that women avoid tenofovir & emtricitabine during pregnancy

Women should be offered the choice to avoid treatment with tenofovir and emtricitabine during pregnancy owing to a higher risk of stillbirth and early infant

Published
13 September 2017
By
Keith Alcorn
Alice Welbourn: WHO and the rights of women living with HIV

A recent set of articles on HIV in pregnancy, published by The BMJ and BMJ Open, raises concerns that some combination anti-retroviral therapies (cARTs) may harm babies. This highlights the need for changes to current WHO practice towards pregnant women living with HIV, which is no doubt well-intentioned but ill thought-out.

Published
12 September 2017
From
BMJ Opinion

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.