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More secondary schooling reduces HIV risk

Longer secondary schooling substantially reduces the risk of HIV infection -- especially for girls -- and could be a very cost-effective way to halt the spread of the virus, according to researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In a study in Botswana, researchers found that, for each additional year of secondary school, students lowered their risk of HIV infection by 8 percentage points about a decade later, from 25 percent to about 17 percent infected.

Published
29 June 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Four in ten people diagnosed with HIV in Europe are migrants

Nearly four out of every ten people with HIV in the European Economic Area (EEA) is a migrant to the country in which they are diagnosed,

Published
24 June 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Drought-Related Hardship Raises HIV Risk, Study Finds

Could savings accounts reduce the spread of HIV? New research concludes buffering people from financial shocks may help keep them from resorting to risky behaviors that spread the virus.

Published
22 June 2015
From
Voice of America
Living in a stigmatizing country increases HIV risk for MSM in Europe

Men who have sex with men (MSM) living in European countries with laws and attitudes that stigmatize male homosexuality often conceal their sexual orientation, have unmet HIV prevention

Published
22 June 2015
By
Michael Carter
Appalachia gripped by hepatitis C epidemic, bracing for HIV

Patton Couch, 25, is one of thousands of young Appalachian drug users recently diagnosed with hepatitis C. Yet public health officials warn that it could get much worse. Two hundred miles north, Scott County, Indiana, is grappling with one of the worst American HIV outbreaks among injection drug users in decades. Kentucky, with the nation's highest rate of acute hepatitis C, might be just a few dirty needles away from a similar catastrophe. "One person could be Typhoid Mary of HIV," said Dr. Jennifer Havens, an epidemiologist at the University of Kentucky's Center on Drug and Alcohol Research, who has studied Perry County drug users for years as the hepatitis rate spiraled through small-town drug circles there. An explosion of hepatitis C, transmitted through injection drug use and unprotected sex, can foreshadow a wave of HIV cases.

Published
04 June 2015
From
CNS
Evidence-based policy movement "unhelpful and unscientific"

Dr Flora Cornish, Associate Professor in Qualitative Research Methodology at the London School of Economics, on why the aspirations of the evidence-based policy movement for bottom line answers are unscientific and unhelpful when evaluating the efficacy of community mobilisation in tackling HIV.

Published
01 June 2015
From
International HIV/AIDS Alliance
When Sex Ed Discusses Gender Inequality, Sex Gets Safer

A new study shows a "striking" difference in effectiveness between programs that address gender and power, and those that don't.

Published
01 June 2015
From
The Atlantic
Harm reduction for people who inject drugs in New York has worked, but hasn’t reduced racial inequality

Needle and syringe exchange and opiate substitution therapy in New York City has worked in reducing HIV infection in people who inject drugs (PWIDs) to the extent

Published
29 May 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Maligned Study on Gay Unions Is Shaking Trust

In 2012, as same-sex marriage advocates were working to build support in California, Michael LaCour, a political science researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, asked a critical question: Can canvassers with a personal stake in an issue — in this case, gay men and women — actually sway voters’ opinions in a lasting way? Last week, their finding that gay canvassers were in fact powerfully persuasive with people who had voted against same-sex marriage — published in December in Science, one of the world’s leading scientific journals — collapsed amid accusations that Mr. LaCour had misrepresented his study methods and lacked the evidence to back up his findings.

Published
26 May 2015
From
New York Times
Funders' priorities and targets hindered community mobilisation and meaningful participation of sex workers in India

Two qualitative studies, investigating the implementation of a massive programme of HIV prevention through community mobilisation in India, have identified challenges to the rapid scale-up and roll-out

Published
25 May 2015
By
Roger Pebody
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