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Iran sees dramatic rise in HIV infections

Iran's health minister, Hassan Hashemi, has expressed serious concerns over a dramatic rise in the number of people with HIV in the country, complaining that the current taboo prevents patients from receiving treatment.

Published
03 December 2013
From
The Guardian
Sex, Lies and HIV: When What You Don’t Tell Your Partner Is a Crime

Nick Rhoades was sentenced to 25 years in prison for having sex without disclosing his HIV status — even though he used a condom, was taking medication to suppress the virus, and didn’t actually transmit HIV.

Published
03 December 2013
From
Pro Publica
International Labour Organization: Employment crucial for successful HIV/AIDS treatment

People living with HIV who are employed are almost 40 per cent more likely to stick to HIV treatment than those without a job, says a new ILO study released ahead of World AIDS Day.

Published
02 December 2013
From
International Labour Organization
Forget politics, HIV could be the deadliest Arab up-rising yet

HIV is thriving in the Middle East and North Africa. Infections have more than doubled since the beginning of the millennium. The epidemic is firmly entrenched in “key” populations, among them men-who-have-sex-with-men, female sex workers and injecting drugs users

Published
02 December 2013
From
The Independent
How will AIDS be Eradicated? - Room for Debate

In the war on H.I.V., we have seen successes in some African nations and stubborn patterns of new infection in developed nations like the U.S. Around the world, there are obstacles to prevention and treatment. How will they be overcome? The New York Times invited seven respondents ranging from the Director of UNAIDS to Sir Elton John to contribute to the debate.

Published
29 November 2013
From
New York Times
Sweden divided over criminalising HIV unprotected sex

HIV diagnosis in Sweden also brings with it the risk of criminal prosecution if the legal responsibility, intended to prevent the spread of the virus, is not met. But Sweden's use of criminal law in HIV cases, one of the most stringent in the world, is now being challenged as experts argue that people on effective anti-retroviral therapy have an extremely low risk of transmitting the disease.

Published
29 November 2013
From
AFP
Rights and Wrongs

Anti-criminalisation campaigner Matthew Weait reviews "Ruins", the documentary about the arrest, exposure and public vilification of a group of women as HIV risks in Greece in the run-up to the 2012 election. "Ruins" explores how the reimplementation of a historic legal regulation by the then Minister of Health, Andreas Loverdos, was used by the police to drag women from the streets on suspicion, but without proof, of being sex workers, to have them tested for HIV against their will in police stations.

Published
29 November 2013
From
The Lancet
Once, When We Were Heroes

My most courageous self, the best man that I'll ever be, lived more than two decades ago during the first years of a horrific plague.

Published
28 November 2013
From
My Fabulous Disease
When fear of being criminalized locks out healthcare

Drug users will avoid a needle exchange programme if they spot a police car cruising nearby, and sex workers will readily toss their condoms in the trash if they risk getting arrested for soliciting. Around the world, the most marginalized groups in society – from Roma to HIV-positive people to sex workers to drug users – are reluctant to access basic health services because they fear arrest, intimidation and harassment.

Published
28 November 2013
From
IRIN
Claim of ‘Self-Inflicted’ H.I.V. in Greece an Error, W.H.O. Says

A claim by the World Health Organization that “about half” of new H.I.V. cases in Greece are “self-inflicted” as a way to get state benefit payments spread like wildfire on social media Monday, but the next day W.H.O. said the claim was the result of an editing error.

Published
26 November 2013
From
New York Times

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