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Neurological and cognitive problems news

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Dolutegravir and central nervous system side-effects: abacavir, older age increase the risk

Insomnia, dizziness, headache and other central nervous system side-effects are occurring more frequently with everyday use of dolutegravir than clinical trials had suggested, and are most likely to

Published
25 October 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
Less than 100% adherence to HIV therapy, even with viral suppression, can lead to more inflammation and immune activation

Research involving men taking antiretroviral therapy, all with an undetectable viral load, has shown that imperfect adherence to therapy is associated with higher levels of key markers of

Published
12 October 2016
By
Michael Carter
HIV-positive gay and bisexual men have increased risk of hospitalisation with anxiety and mood disorders, a risk factor for later mortality

HIV-positive gay and bisexual men are almost ten times more likely to be hospitalised because of mood and anxiety disorders than men in the general population, according

Published
07 September 2016
By
Michael Carter
Elevated lipids associated with cognitive decline in middle-aged HIV-positive men doing well on ART

Elevated cholesterol and a gene associated with Alzheimer’s risk in the general population are both risk factors for cognitive decline in middle-aged HIV-positive people with a suppressed viral

Published
29 August 2016
By
Michael Carter
VACS Index score can help identify HIV-positive people most at risk of neurocognitive decline

A combination of simple, routine blood tests may be able to predict which people living with HIV are especially vulnerable to neurocognitive decline, according to US research published

Published
04 July 2016
By
Michael Carter
Neurologic symptoms common in early HIV infection

Half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues, research shows. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started antiretroviral therapy.

Published
14 June 2016
From
Science Daily
HIV-positive women with childhood trauma have double the brain trouble

HIV-positive women who have endured a trauma such as emotional, physical or sexual abuse, or neglect earlier in their lives are more likely to have trouble remembering, paying attention or multitasking. Parts of their brains are also smaller than women who are only affected by HIV.

Published
26 May 2016
From
The Conversation
Dementia in HIV -- HAND or Alzheimer's?

Turner and colleagues at Georgetown's Memory Disorders Program argue that the usual diagnosis of dementia in HIV patients -- HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, or HAND -- might not be the whole picture. And if some patients present with HAND, Alzheimer's or a mixture, Turner told MedPage Today, clinicians will need to broaden their differential diagnosis to get the right therapy.

Published
28 April 2016
From
MedPage Today HIV/AIDS
First diagnosed case of Alzheimer's disease in HIV-positive individual reported

Georgetown University researchers are reporting the first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual. The finding in a 71-year-old man triggers a realization about HIV survivors now reaching the age when Alzheimer's risk begins to escalate.

Published
15 April 2016
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Antidepressant modestly improves HIV-related cognitive impairment

The SSRI antidepressant paroxetine (Paxil) was associated with modest improvement in cognitive function and reduced central nervous system inflammation in people with HIV-related neurocognitive disorder, but the antifungal drug

Published
31 March 2016
By
Liz Highleyman
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.