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Neurological and cognitive problems news

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Stigma impairs cognition in men living with HIV

A new study has drawn a direct link between the amount of stigma men with HIV report experiencing and their scores on cognitive tests, measuring abilities such as memory and attention.

Published
29 November 2018
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
ART Reduces Neurocognitive Impairment in Patients Living With HIV

Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) may reduce the risk for neurocognitive impairment in patients living with HIV, according to study results published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Published
12 October 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
Loneliness associated with poorer cognitive function, mental health and physical health in older people with HIV

Loneliness in older HIV-positive adults is associated with reduced cognitive function as well as poorer mental and physical health, according to Canadian research presented to the recent

Published
25 September 2018
By
Michael Carter
Physical Activity Associated With Cognitive Benefits in Women Living With HIV

Physical activity may protect against cognitive impairment in women living with HIV, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Infectious Disease.

Published
20 September 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
The Healthier Your Heart, the Healthier Your Brain May Be

The more measures of cardiovascular health older people had, the less likely they were to develop dementia.

Published
22 August 2018
From
New York Times
Neuropsychiatric side-effects lead only 1 in 40 to drop dolutegravir, French study shows

A large French study of people taking HIV treatment that contained an integrase inhibitor found that approximately one person in forty who started treatment with dolutegravir stopped

Published
22 August 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Hep C and Substance Abuse May Exacerbate Brain Declines in People With HIV

A major mitigating factor may be treating HIV with antiretrovirals.

Published
17 August 2018
From
Poz
Physicians Should Look Out for Neurosyphilis in Gay Men With HIV

This is according to a new paper detailing a case study of a man whose long-term syphilis infection affected his brain.

Published
13 July 2018
From
Poz
HIV Patients on Opioid Therapy Often Aren't Monitored for Addiction

Opioids have become a common treatment for people living with HIV who also deal with chronic pain. However, new research suggests those patients aren’t receiving robust monitoring to prevent opioid misuse, despite evidence that most are open to it.

Published
02 July 2018
From
MD Magazine
Closer Monitoring Recommended for Older Patients Treated With Dolutegravir for HIV

The maximum concentration of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (DTG) was significantly higher in people living with HIV who are more than 60 years old compared with younger individuals, according to new findings published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.There have been recent concerns about DTG-related neuropsychiatric toxicity, especially among older patients with HIV.

Published
11 June 2018
From
Infectious Disease Advisor
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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.