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Disappointing result for tenofovir-gel microbicide shows that young women still lack HIV prevention methods they can use

Among some highly promising results from HIV prevention studies presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015) in Seattle, USA, today, there was

Published
25 February 2015
By
Gus Cairns
York trials new HIV prevention method

Scientists at the University of York, in conjunction with the York Clinical Research Facility, will start the first phase of trials looking into a new way to prevent HIV transmission.

Published
18 February 2015
From
HIV / AIDS News From Medical News Today
VOICE trial: Microbicide gel may have stopped two out of three HIV infections – in the women who used it

The final published paper on the VOICE trial in women in three African countries mainly reinforces what conference presentations have already shown: this ambitious trial failed to

Published
09 February 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Failed Trial in Africa Raises Questions About How to Test HIV Drugs

The failure of the VOICE trial of H.I.V.-prevention methods in Africa — and the elaborate deceptions employed by the women in it — have opened an ethical debate about how to run such studies in poor countries and have already changed the design of some that are now underway.

Published
05 February 2015
From
New York Times
Uganda: High Hopes Ahead of Microbicide Trial Results

HIV/Aids researchers are anticipating positive results from a large-scale trial assessing the efficacy of a vaginal microbicide gel in preventing HIV infection in women.

Published
21 January 2015
From
AllAfrica.com
Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: The neglected pathway

Dr. Deborah Anderson from Boston University School of Medicine and her colleagues are challenging dogma about the transmission of HIV. Most research has focused on infection by free viral particles, while this group proposes that HIV is also transmitted by infected cells. While inside cells, HIV is protected from antibodies and other antiviral factors. Anderson chides fellow researchers for not using cell-associated HIV in their transmission models: "The failure of several recent vaccine and microbicide clinical trials to prevent HIV transmission may be due in part to this oversight." . The Journal of Infectious Diseases (JID) has devoted their December supplement to this important and understudied topic.

Published
23 December 2014
From
Medical News Today
Strategies to improve male partner involvement in microbicide research needed

Vaginal microbicides were partially developed in response to power differentials within sexual relationships and gender norms that make it difficult for women to negotiate other forms of HIV

Published
17 December 2014
By
Lesley Odendal
Looking to a New Era for Women's HIV Prevention: Zeda Rosenberg

Zeda Rosenberg, Chief Executive Offiver of the International Partnership for Microbicides, says: "While there is much progress to celebrate in HIV treatment and prevention, protecting women remains a major challenge. AIDS is the number-one killer of women ages 15 to 44 worldwide. Women are biologically more vulnerable to infection and face deep-rooted gender inequities that increase their risk. In sub-Saharan Africa, where the epidemic has taken the greatest toll, young women are at least twice as likely to contract HIV as young men."

Published
26 November 2014
From
Huffington Post
As strategies to prevent HIV and unintended pregnancies evolve, concepts of “multi-purpose technologies” raise a familiar question . . .

What do women want? While two trials test vaginal rings to fight HIV, market research highlights respondents’ interests in different options.

Published
14 November 2014
From
Science Speaks
Semen directly impairs effectiveness of microbicides that target HIV

Most microbicides work by targeting the virus itself, attempting to break it down or blocking its ability to infect a cell. However, the heightened infectiousness of HIV in the presence of semen appears to over-power any anti-viral effects the microbicides possess. The one exception to this finding is a different type of microbicide that acts on the host cells' receptors, stopping the virus from latching on from within. In the current study, this microbicide, [containing the drug called] called Maraviroc, was equally effective in preventing infection both with and without the presence of semen.

Published
13 November 2014
From
MedicalXpress
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