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Are "Sugar Daddies" to Blame for HIV Transmission in Africa?

It was long assumed that a major driver of the vastly greater prevalence of HIV infection in Zimbabwe, South Africa and other epicenters of the African HIV epidemic is intergeneratioal sex - sepcifically, young women having sexual realtionships with older "sugar daddies". Contrary to expectations, a recent high-quality, longitudinal study showed that participation in intergenerational sex did not impact the likelihood of contracting HIV infection.

Published
05 September 2014
From
Scientific American
Does the global HIV response understand anal sex?

Stigma, squeamishness and misunderstanding of anal sex is leading to research gaps and inaccurate information about the risks of this common sexual behaviour, and hindering effective HIV/AIDS prevention strategies, experts say. A move towards "sex positive" approaches could enhance social acceptance and increase protection.

Published
28 August 2014
From
IRIN
What’s Your Long-term Risk of Transmitting HIV?

How mathematical models can help us better understand both the long-term probability of HIV transmission and the benefit of combining risk-reduction strategies.

Published
04 July 2014
From
Poz
HIV transmission risks: Review updates CDC estimates, adds impact of treatment, condom use

Authors of a comprehensive review of literature reporting data on per-act HIV transmission risks have updated the last estimates produced by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2005, and in the process have highlighted the importance of treatment and prevention reaching those at greatest risk.

Published
05 June 2014
From
Science Speaks
Second analysis concludes that we can't eliminate the long-term possibility of HIV transmission from someone on treatment

A study that estimates the risk that someone living with HIV and taking antiretroviral therapy could transmit the virus reports that, on the basis of the

Published
31 May 2014
By
Gus Cairns
Uganda's struggle with schistosomiasis

Efforts are underway to rid Uganda of the scourge of schistosomiasis but provision of clean water and good sanitation lags behind treatment efforts. The disease is linked to increased infection rates of HIV among girls.

Published
16 May 2014
From
The Lancet
A Simple Theory, and a Proposal, on HIV in Africa

Norwegian researchers believe that African women are more vulnerable to H.I.V. because of a chronic, undiagnosed parasitic disease: genital schistosomiasis. Also known as bilharzia and snail fever, it is caused by parasitic worms picked up in infested river water. It is marked by fragile sores in the far reaches of the vaginal canal that may serve as entry points for H.I.V.

Published
11 May 2014
From
New York Times
How a House Finch Disease Reshaped What We Know About Epidemics

One team of researchers was able to study a highly virulent disease in House Finches. Their recent paper in PLOS Biology sheds light on what makes some disease-causing microbes, or pathogens, more harmful than others.

Published
30 January 2014
From
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Bursting HIV’s bubble

HIV has a fatty outer membrane similar to that surrounding a living cell. This membrane probably acts like a balloon—in other words the pressure inside it is greater than the pressure outside it. That means it can be burst, which is what some scientists believe provides the driving force by which a virus injects its genetic material into a cell in order to infect it.

Published
18 October 2013
From
The Economist
Cocaine May Fuel HIV Acquisition and Its Spread Between Cells

Cocaine may increase an individual’s likelihood of acquiring HIV, by stimulating a pair of receptors on inactive CD4 cells. The findings are limited by the fact that the research was not conducted in humans and also because typical cocaine users partake of the drug over a more extended period of time than in the experiment.

Published
16 October 2013
From
AIDSMeds
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