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New Thai-Taiwanese Syndrome Is Not AIDS 2.0

The headlines are frightening: unrelated, otherwise healthy patients in Asia turning up with symptoms doctors associate with HIV infection. But though many questions remain about the new immunodeficiency, it’s not a harbinger of a global health calamity, says Kent Sepkowitz.

Published
28 August 2012
From
Daily Beast
Virus throws a wrench in the immune system

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a member of the herpesvirus family. Although most people carry CMV for life, it hardly ever makes them sick. Researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and from the USA have now unveiled long term consequences of the on-going presence of CMV: Later in life, more and more cells of the immune system concentrate on CMV, and as a result, the response against other viruses is weakened. These research results help to explain why the elderly are often more prone to infectious diseases than young people. The viral immunologist Professor Luka Cicin-Sain, head of the junior research group "Immune Aging and Chronic Infections" at the HZI in Braunschweig, Germany, and his colleagues have now published their discovery in the open access journal PLoS Pathogens. In the article, they describe that even months after infection with CMV, mice still show weaker responses against other viruses such as the flu virus.

Published
17 August 2012
From
EurekAlert
Immediate Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces HIV Infection of Resting CD4 T-Cells

Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the acute phase of HIV infection appears to reduce the number of latently infected resting CD4 T-cells in most people, but this may not be the case for individuals with very few initially infected cells, according to a study published in the May 29, 2012, advance online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Published
14 June 2012
From
HIVandHepatitis.com
UCSF researchers identify a potential new HIV vaccine/therapy target

After being infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in a laboratory study, rhesus macaques that had more of a certain type of immune cell in their gut than others had much lower levels of the virus in their blood, and for six months after infection were better able to control the virus.

Published
31 May 2012
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Researchers discover new HIV-suppressing protein

Scientists have identified a new HIV-suppressing protein in the blood of people infected with the virus. In laboratory studies, the protein, called CXCL4 or PF-4, binds to HIV such that it cannot attach to or enter a human cell.

Published
30 May 2012
From
News-Medical.net
Mechanism of HIV spread has potential for future drug therapy

A new understanding of the initial interactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and dendritic cells is described by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers in a study currently featured in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Published
24 April 2012
From
Google Alerts HIV
HIV 'superinfection' boosts immune response: Findings may provide insight into HIV-vaccine development

Women who have been infected by two different strains of HIV from two different sexual partners – a condition known as HIV superinfection – have more potent antibody responses that block the replication of the virus compared to women who’ve only been infected once.

Published
30 March 2012
From
Science Daily
Superinfection: second HIV infections happen as often as first ones

Two studies of people with HIV in Rakai, Uganda and Mombasa, Kenya presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections show that the rate at

Published
10 March 2012
By
Gus Cairns
Deeper view of HIV reveals impact of early mutations

Mutations in HIV that develop during the first few weeks of infection may play a critical role in undermining a successful early immune response, a finding that reveals the importance of vaccines targeting regions of the virus that are less likely to mutate.

Published
09 March 2012
From
Science Daily (press release)
A new patient zero? Researchers may have spotted animal-to-human immunodeficiency virus transfer

A group of scientists working in Ivory Coast may have discovered a case of infection of a human with a novel variety of an animal immunodeficiency virus,

Published
07 March 2012
By
Gus Cairns

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