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Rapid pace of liver damage in recent HCV co-infection

The research suggests that HIV-positive people who later become co-infected with HCV are at risk for an accelerated pace of liver damage, perhaps caused by underlying immunological dysfunction.

Published
21 January 2013
From
CATIE
Copy of Rapid pace of liver damage in recent HCV co-infection

The research suggests that HIV-positive people who later become co-infected with HCV are at risk for an accelerated pace of liver damage, perhaps caused by underlying immunological dysfunction.

Published
21 January 2013
From
CATIE
Africa: Study Confirms Role of Road Networks in HIV Spread

Road networks are strongly related to the spread of HIV-1 - the HIV subtype responsible for the AIDS pandemic - across Sub-Saharan Africa, a study confirms.

Published
14 January 2013
From
AllAfrica
Groundbreaking Research Discovers Possible New Way To Fight HIV

New research has disocvered how the HIV virus targets memory T-cells or "veterans" instead of naive "virgin" T-cells. This could potentially change how drugs are used to halt the virus. This research finds that HIV exploits the fact that memory T-cells are more mobile; it uses the cytoskeleton, the internal structure of the cell, as a "conveyor belt" to carry it deep within the cell and to the nucleus. The researchers are now looking at whether drugs that reduce cancer cell motility could reduce the "attractiveness" of T-memory cells to HIV.

Published
25 October 2012
From
Medical News Today
The genetics of HIV-1 resistance

New research has examined the genetic footprint that drug resistance causes in HIV and found compensatory polymorphisms that help the resistant virus to survive.

Published
08 October 2012
From
Science Daily
HIV could be turning salmonella nastier

A nastier kind of salmonella infection has emerged alongside the HIV epidemic in Africa. The finding is the first evidence that HIV might be allowing new human pathogens to evolve in immunosuppressed people.

Published
02 October 2012
From
New Scientist
In heterosexuals, transmitted HIV strains often resemble original infecting virus

A new study has found that even though HIV diversifies widely within infected individuals over time, the virus strains that ultimately are passed on through heterosexual transmission often resemble the strain of virus that originally infected the transmitting partner. Learning the characteristics of these preferentially transmitted HIV strains may help advance HIV prevention efforts, particularly with regard to an HIV vaccine, according to the scientists who conducted the study.

Published
25 September 2012
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
New Thai-Taiwanese Syndrome Is Not AIDS 2.0

The headlines are frightening: unrelated, otherwise healthy patients in Asia turning up with symptoms doctors associate with HIV infection. But though many questions remain about the new immunodeficiency, it’s not a harbinger of a global health calamity, says Kent Sepkowitz.

Published
28 August 2012
From
Daily Beast
Virus throws a wrench in the immune system

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a member of the herpesvirus family. Although most people carry CMV for life, it hardly ever makes them sick. Researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and from the USA have now unveiled long term consequences of the on-going presence of CMV: Later in life, more and more cells of the immune system concentrate on CMV, and as a result, the response against other viruses is weakened. These research results help to explain why the elderly are often more prone to infectious diseases than young people. The viral immunologist Professor Luka Cicin-Sain, head of the junior research group "Immune Aging and Chronic Infections" at the HZI in Braunschweig, Germany, and his colleagues have now published their discovery in the open access journal PLoS Pathogens. In the article, they describe that even months after infection with CMV, mice still show weaker responses against other viruses such as the flu virus.

Published
17 August 2012
From
EurekAlert
Immediate Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces HIV Infection of Resting CD4 T-Cells

Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the acute phase of HIV infection appears to reduce the number of latently infected resting CD4 T-cells in most people, but this may not be the case for individuals with very few initially infected cells, according to a study published in the May 29, 2012, advance online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Published
14 June 2012
From
HIVandHepatitis.com

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