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HIV can spread early, evolve in patients' brains

HIV can genetically evolve and independently replicate in patients' brains early in the illness process, an analysis of cerebral spinal fluid has found. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with antiretroviral therapy should reduce the risk that the virus could find refuge and cause damage in the brain, where some medications are less effective -- potentially enabling it to re-emerge, even after it is suppressed in the periphery, say researchers.

Published
27 March 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Inflammation and gut leakage remains elevated in people with HIV despite early antiretroviral treatment

Inflammatory changes and damage to the gut begin very soon after initial HIV infection, and may not return to normal even when people start antiretroviral therapy (ART)

Published
16 March 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
Does HIV make you fat? Study connects viral load with fat gains

HIV infection, or inflammatory changes associated with it, may be responsible for fat accumulation and body fat redistribution, rather than HIV drugs, the Conference on Retroviruses and

Published
06 March 2015
By
Gus Cairns
Two Strains of HIV Cut Vastly Different Paths

It’s now clear, researchers say, that HIV originated in humans on 13 separate occasions, evolving in humans from ancestral viruses that infected monkeys, chimpanzees and gorillas.

Published
03 March 2015
From
New York Times
Gorilla origins of the last two HIV-1 lineages confirmed

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists. HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS, has jumped species to infect humans on at least four separate occasions, generating four HIV-1 lineages -- groups M, N, O, and P. Previous research from this team found that groups M and N originated in geographically distinct chimpanzee communities in southern Cameroon, but the origins of groups O and P remained uncertain.

Published
03 March 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
HIV Likely Evolved to Enter Latent State Because This Fuels Survival

A pair of new studies suggest that HIV evolved to enter into a latent state in order to thrive in the long run, and that the virus itself, and not infected immune cells, controls when replication stops and starts.

Published
02 March 2015
From
AIDSMeds
Inflammation Persists Despite Very Early HIV Treatment

Biomarkers of inflammation increase during acute HIV infection and remain elevated despite early suppressive antiretroviral therapy, according to a study presented at CROI 2015, in Seattle, Washington.

Published
27 February 2015
From
The Body Pro
Fast-replicating HIV strains drive inflammation and disease progression

The results confirmed the team's previous finding that the replicative capacity of the newly established virus drives how quickly infected individuals' levels of CD4 T cells declined. People infected with viruses with high replicative capacity had more signs of acute inflammation in the first few months of infection. Their T cells displayed more signs of "exhaustion," which sets the stage for faster disease progression.

Published
20 February 2015
From
Emory University press release
Researchers may have caught HIV becoming more virulent

A study from Cuba has generated wide media interest because researchers have identified a particular variety of the virus which is associated with rapid post-diagnosis falls in

Published
19 February 2015
By
Gus Cairns
An aggressive form of HIV uncovered in Cuba

Engaging in unprotected sex with multiple partners increases the risk of contracting multiple strains of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Once inside a host, these strains can recombine into a new variant of the virus. One such recombinant variant observed in patients in Cuba appears to be much more aggressive than other known forms of HIV. Patients progress to AIDS within three years of infection – so rapidly that they may not even realise they were infected.

Published
16 February 2015
From
KU Leuven press release

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