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Bacteria, viruses in gut linked to severity of HIV infection

HIV infection also can lead to diseases affecting the intestines, with increased gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation, diarrhea and problems with nutrient absorption. The role of gut microbes in such issues is not completely understood, but now, in two studies led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, scientists have identified intestinal bacteria and viruses as possible sources of such inflammation and disease.

Published
11 March 2016
From
HIV / AIDS News From Medical News Today
Bacteria in our gut affects HIV—is there a solution?

Across our bodies colonies of microorganisms flourish. The largest microbiome colony lives in our gastrointestinal tract—our gut—and in healthy people, helps us do things like digest carbohydrates, produce vitamins and prevent harmful pathogens from flourishing. When there’s a disruption to our gut microbiome, problems can arise. Now, researchers are investigating how HIV and the microbiome are linked.

Published
25 February 2016
From
BETA blog
HIV-infected vaginal cells do not transmit HIV if plasma viral load is undetectable, researchers find

A group of researchers have cleared up an important question about HIV transmission, in experiments on mice. Although HIV-infected CD4 cells persist in the vagina even on

Published
15 February 2016
By
Gus Cairns
Two cases of PrEP failure on solo tenofovir pose significant research questions

A report originally presented to the 2015 BHIVA conference last year details two cases where therapeutic levels of solo tenofovir unequivocally failed to prevent HIV infection in

Published
14 January 2016
By
Gus Cairns
Does low-level HIV viral load raise the risk of disease progression and co-morbidities?

People living with HIV who have a detectable but low viral load – in the range of 50 to 500 or 1000 copies/ml – may continue to

Published
09 November 2015
By
Liz Highleyman
Fat Tissue May Be Another Part of HIV Reservoir

In addition to possibly being a component of the HIV reservoir, fat tissue may also be a source of harmful chronic inflammation among those living with the virus. Publishing their findings in PLOS Pathogens, researchers studied adipose (fat) tissue in both macaque monkeys infected with SIV, HIV’s simian cousin, as well as HIV-positive humans who underwent elective abdominal surgery.

Published
28 September 2015
From
Aidsmeds
Infection with multiple HIV-1 variants leads to poorer clinical outcomes

HIV-1 infection with multiple founder variants points to poorer clinical outcomes than infection with a single variant, according to a paper published today in Nature Medicine. In the study researchers analyzed large sample sets from two important HIV vaccine efficacy trials -- the Step HIV vaccine clinical trial (HVTN 502) and RV144, the landmark vaccine clinical trial conducted in Thailand -- to evaluate whether genetic characteristics of the founder viral populations could influence markers of clinical outcomes.

Published
01 September 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
The Low-Down on Inflammation from an HIV Doctor

Inflammation is the generic term for the body’s response to injury. During injury, the immune system—our body’s defense system—activates a complicated network of cells and chemical signals. Acute inflammation, immune activation that’s rapid and self-limited, is essential for healing. But chronic inflammation, immune activation that continues even after the initial injury is gone, is problematic. Chronic inflammation is like a volume control knob on a stereo being stuck—with the volume turned all the way up.

Published
24 August 2015
From
BETA blog
How long have primates been infected with viruses related to HIV?

A study published on Aug. 20th in PLOS Pathogens of antiviral gene sequences in African monkeys suggests that lentiviruses closely related to HIV have infected primates in Africa as far back as 16 million years.

Published
21 August 2015
From
Eurekalert Inf Dis
Targets proliferate in HIV cure research

The Towards an HIV Cure two-day symposium has become a fixture in advance of the International AIDS Society conferences and this one featured a more varied range

Published
21 July 2015
By
Gus Cairns

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