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Can England really eliminate hepatitis C by 2025?

The World Health Organisation set a goal to eliminate hepatitis C by 2030. The NHS recently announced that it will go one better than that: it will eliminate the disease in England by 2025. In theory, the goal is achievable, but there are still significant challenges to overcome.

Published
05 February 2018
From
The Conversation UK
Deaths from liver cancer nearly double since the 1990s, new figures reveal

Over the last two decades, deaths caused by liver cancer have increased by 80 percent, making it one of the fastest-growing causes of cancer deaths worldwide.

Published
01 February 2018
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
Harm reduction scale-up needed to eliminate HCV in people who inject drugs, European model predicts

Elimination of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in Europe will require simultaneous scale-up of direct-acting antiviral treatment, needle and syringe programmes (NSP) and

Published
01 February 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Georgia: 98% of people in Hepatitis C elimination program cured

Around 45,000 people have gone through medical treatment for Hepatitis C in Georgia, 98 percent of which were cured, the head of Georgia’s National Center for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC) Amiran Gamkrelidze said.

Published
31 January 2018
From
Agenda.ge
NHS England seeks drug price cuts to eliminate hepatitis C by 2025

NHS England announced this week that it aims to eliminate hepatitis C by 2025 – if it can negotiate 'best value for money' deals with the pharmaceutical

Published
30 January 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
NHS England sets out plans to be first in the world to eliminate Hepatitis C

England could be the first country in the world to eliminate Hepatitis C, under ambitious plans announced by the NHS today.

Published
29 January 2018
From
NHS England
Viral suppression protects against long-term liver damage caused by older HIV drugs

A history of treatment with some older antiretroviral drugs can have a lasting negative impact on liver health, German researchers report in PLOS One. They

Published
29 January 2018
By
Michael Carter
Managing the Fruits of HCV Cure: How Much Care do the Cured Need?

An additional dimension of HCV infection about which our knowledge has dramatically expanded is the potential for extrahepatic morbidity and mortality associated with HCV infection, and the opportunity to ameliorate or prevent such outcomes by effecting virologic cure — problems such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, renal disease, cryoglobulinemia, lymphoma and others.

Published
22 January 2018
From
Healio
Smoking reduces survival after liver cancer diagnosis for people with viral hepatitis

People with viral hepatitis who smoked were three times more likely to die after being diagnosed with liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC), according to a

Published
18 January 2018
By
Keith Alcorn
Hepatitis C treatment highly effective in harder-to-treat people with HIV co-infection, Spanish real-life study shows

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment using direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) is highly effective and safe in harder-to-treat people with HIV co-infection, Spanish researchers report in AIDS.

Published
16 January 2018
By
Michael Carter

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.