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Buyers clubs for cheaper drugs help fight hepatitis and HIV

Frustrated by the high price of antiviral drugs, thousands of patients from London to Moscow to Sydney are turning to a new wave of online "buyers clubs" to get cheap generic medicines to cure hepatitis C and protect against HIV infection.

Published
07 November 2016
From
Reuters
The Cost Of A Cure: Revisiting Medicare Part D And Hepatitis C Drugs

Preliminary estimates, based on data obtained from CMS by the Associated Press, suggest that 2015 spending on the new hepatitis C drugs was $9.2 billion or roughly double the 2014 levels. This level of spending projects to about 100,000 new individual users, allowing for some duplication of people who continued the treatment they started in 2014.

Published
04 November 2016
From
Health Affairs (blog)
Gilead sales of Hepatitis C drugs slump

Gilead Sciences Inc. on Tuesday said sales of hepatitis C drugs Harvoni and Sovaldi missed expectations and slumped in the third-quarter, as the biopharmaceutical company faces challenges from rival drugs and pricing pressures.

Published
02 November 2016
From
MarketWatch
Over 1 million treated with highly effective hepatitis C medicines

Over one million people in low- and middle-income countries have been treated with a revolutionary new cure for hepatitis C since its introduction two years ago.

Published
27 October 2016
From
World Health Organization
Generic hepatitis C drugs purchased online achieve high cure rates

Use of generic versions of direct-acting antivirals resulted in very high cure rates for people who obtained the products through three buyers’ clubs, indicating that the generic

Published
27 October 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
New $90-$90-$90 target needed for global viral hepatitis, HIV and TB treatment

The costs of making drugs to treat viral hepatitis, HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are now so low that each disease could be treated for less than

Published
24 October 2016
By
Keith Alcorn
A promising Hep C program seems to be working — and it could be a model for other countries

Georgia, a country nestled against the Black Sea between Turkey and Russia with a population of 3.7 million, has since taken on a public health effort to help reduce its prevalence of hepatitis C (HCV for short) by 90% by 2020.

Published
24 October 2016
From
Business Insider
Eliminating hepatitis C as a major public health threat needs a two-pronged attack

So where do we stand on the road to elimination? Early indications suggest that improved access to treatment may already be having an impact with preliminary UK figures suggesting a 11% fall in deaths from hepatitis C related end-stage liver disease and cancer in 2015.

Published
18 October 2016
From
Public Health England
Decriminalization is a public health strategy

We can’t end the viral hepatitis epidemics unless we end the war on drug users.

Published
18 October 2016
From
Treatment Action Group
We could prevent millions of cancer deaths with knowledge we already have

Cutting-edge breakthroughs are still vital in medicine, but we have many ways to prevent and cure cancer that aren’t globally accessible – but should be.

Published
18 October 2016
From
The Guardian

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.