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Hepatitis C-related deaths hit record high in US, CDC says

Deaths from the liver disease hepatitis C reached an all-time high in 2014, killing more Americans than HIV, tuberculosis and staph infections. New data released Wednesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that more Americans die now as a result of hepatitis C infection than from 60 other infectious diseases combined.

Published
05 May 2016
From
Washington Post
Sky-high price of hepatitis C drug produces profits for lawmakers

While patients in Massachusetts await affordable doses of the blockbuster hepatitis C drug Sovaldi, Rep. Joseph Kennedy III has financially benefited from the success of the drug’s manufacturer, Gilead Sciences, according to public financial disclosures and campaign finance records.

Published
05 May 2016
From
Center for Responsive Politics
Antiviral therapies give Hepatitis C cirrhosis patients similar life expectancy as general population

The survival rate of patients with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis who respond well to antiviral therapies equals that of the general population, say investigators in the Journal of Hepatology.

Published
05 May 2016
From
Eurekalert Medicine & Health
The Drugs Consensus Is Not Pretty - It's Been Ripped Apart at the Seams

The UNGASS was certainly not a success for the defenders of the status quo. The consensus on punitive prohibition has been well and truly ripped apart at the seams. This UNGASS demonstrates the impact civil society pressure can achieve. The drug policy reform movement will continue to grow into a formidable global social movement towards 2019. The collective demand for change will grow ever louder leading to sustainable and seismic break-throughs at national, regional and ultimately UN levels.

Published
04 May 2016
From
International Drug Policy Consortium
First Canadian Study Demonstrates Potential to Remove Patients from Active Liver Transplant List After Curing Hepatitis C

Researchers with the Multi-Organ Transplant Program at London Health Sciences Centre and the Lawson Health Research Institute have been able to remove one-third (33 per cent) of patients from the active liver transplant waiting list by "curing" them of their Hepatitis C disease.

Published
03 May 2016
From
Lawson Health Research Institute press release
'Aggressive' pricing helps Merck steal hep C share with newcomer Zepatier

Merck & Co. has yet to report first-quarter earnings, so industry watchers still don’t know exactly how much market share the company’s new hep C combo treatment, Zepatier, has scored since winning approval in late January. But so far, comments from its competitors suggest it’s doing pretty well for itself.

Published
03 May 2016
From
Fierce Pharma
People treated for hepatitis C have unexpectedly high rate of liver cancer recurrence

Hepatitis C patients with cirrhosis who were treated with direct-acting antivirals had about twice the expected likelihood of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with the excess risk seen

Published
29 April 2016
By
Liz Highleyman
Portugal's roll-out of HCV therapy with DAAs achieves impressive results

Roll-out of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy using direct acting antivirals (DAAs) has achieved excellent outcomes in Portugal, data presented to the International Liver Congress in Barcelona shows.

Published
27 April 2016
By
Michael Carter
New York Insurers to Change Coverage of Hepatitis C Drugs

Seven health-insurance companies in New York will change their criteria for covering costly drugs that cure chronic hepatitis C under the terms of agreements with the office of State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.

Published
26 April 2016
From
Wall Street Journal
Hepatitis C linked to increased risk of head, neck cancers, study suggests

People with hepatitis C may have at least twice the risk of developing certain head and neck cancers as individuals who don’t carry the virus, a U.S. study suggests.

Published
26 April 2016
From
The Globe and Mail

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